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Plant Cell. 2017 Apr;29(4):760-774. doi: 10.1105/tpc.16.00669. Epub 2017 Mar 28.

Different Cold-Signaling Pathways Function in the Responses to Rapid and Gradual Decreases in Temperature.

Author information

1
Laboratory of Plant Molecular Physiology, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8657, Japan.
2
Gene Discovery Research Group, RIKEN Centre for Sustainable Resource Science, Yokohama, Kanagawa 230-0045, Japan.
3
Laboratory of Plant Molecular Physiology, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8657, Japan akys@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp.

Abstract

In plants, cold temperatures trigger stress responses and long-term responses that result in cold tolerance. In Arabidopsis thaliana, three dehydration-responsive element (DRE) binding protein 1/C-repeat binding factors (DREB1/CBFs) act as master switches in cold-responsive gene expression. Induction of DREB1 genes triggers the cold stress-inducible transcriptional cascade, followed by the induction of numerous genes that function in the cold stress response and cold tolerance. Many regulatory factors involved in DREB1 induction have been identified, but how these factors orchestrate the cold stress-specific expression of DREB1s has not yet been clarified. Here, we revealed that plants recognize cold stress as two different signals, rapid and gradual temperature decreases, and induce expression of the DREB1 genes. CALMODULIN BINDING TRANSCRIPTION ACTIVATOR3 (CAMTA3) and CAMTA5 respond to a rapid decrease in temperature and induce the expression of DREB1s, but these proteins do not respond to a gradual decrease in temperature. Moreover, they function during the day and night, in contrast to some key circadian components, including CIRCADIAN CLOCK ASSOCIATED1 and LATE ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL, which regulate cold-responsive DREB1 expression as transcriptional activators only during the day. Thus, plants efficiently control the acquisition of freezing tolerance using two different signaling pathways in response to a gradual temperature decrease during seasonal changes and a sudden temperature drop during the night.

PMID:
28351986
PMCID:
PMC5435423
DOI:
10.1105/tpc.16.00669
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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