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Tumour Biol. 2017 Mar;39(3):1010428317695040. doi: 10.1177/1010428317695040.

Methylomics of breast cancer: Seeking epimarkers in peripheral blood of young subjects.

Author information

1
1 Department of Medical Genetics, School of Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
2
2 Department of Medical Genetics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran, Iran.
3
3 Department of Medical Genetics, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran, Iran.
4
4 Hematology, Oncology and Stem Cell Transplantation Research Center, Shariati Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
5
5 Chronic Disease Research Center, Endocrinology and Metabolism Population Sciences Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
6
6 Metabolic Disorders Research Center, Endocrinology and Metabolism Molecular-Cellular Sciences Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Abstract

Critical roles of epigenomic alterations in the pathogenesis of breast cancer have recently seized great attentions toward finding epimarkers in either non-invasive or semi-non-invasive samples as well as peripheral blood. In this way, methylated DNA immunoprecipitation microarray (MeDIP-chip) was performed on DNA samples isolated from white blood cells of 30 breast cancer patients compared to 30 healthy controls. A total of 1799 differentially methylated regions were identified including SLC6A3, Rab40C, ZNF584, and FOXD3 whose significant methylation differences were confirmed in breast cancer patients through quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Hypermethylation of APC, HDAC1, and GSK1 genes has been previously reported in more than one study on tissue samples of breast cancer. Methylation of those aforementioned genes in white blood cells of our young patients not only relies on their importance in breast cancer pathogenesis but also may highlight their potential as early epimarkers that makes further assessments necessary in large cohort studies.

KEYWORDS:

White blood cells; breast cancer; methylation; microarray

PMID:
28349825
DOI:
10.1177/1010428317695040
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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