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Ann Thorac Surg. 2017 Aug;104(2):681-686. doi: 10.1016/j.athoracsur.2016.12.032. Epub 2017 Mar 24.

Infant Motor Skills After a Cardiac Operation: The Need for Developmental Monitoring and Care.

Author information

1
Department of Cardiac Surgery, University of Michigan Mott Children's Hospital, Ann Arbor, Michigan; Department of Pediatrics, University of Michigan Mott Children's Hospital, Ann Arbor, Michigan. Electronic address: karenu@med.umich.edu.
2
Department of Pediatrics, University of Michigan Mott Children's Hospital, Ann Arbor, Michigan.
3
Department of Cardiac Surgery, University of Michigan Mott Children's Hospital, Ann Arbor, Michigan; Department of Pediatrics, University of Michigan Mott Children's Hospital, Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Neurodevelopmental dysfunction is increasingly recognized as a common outcome of congenital heart defects and their treatment in infancy. The effects of the intensive care unit (ICU) experience and environment on these infants are unknown and potentially modifiable, but no validated metric is available for objective evaluation of early motor impairments in the ICU/hospital setting. The purpose of this study was to characterize the motor status of hospitalized infants after cardiac operations, including the development and field-testing of the Congenital Heart Assessment of Sensory and Motor Status (CHASMS) metric.

METHODS:

CHASMS item generation was based on review of the literature, focused interviews with parents, and expert consensus. A nurse administered CHASMS to 100 infants aged younger than 10 months old undergoing cardiac operations. Preoperative and postoperative CHASMS scores were compared, and associations between CHASMS scores and patient characteristics were examined. Physical therapists assessed neuromotor skills by using the Test of Infant Motor Performance or the Alberta Infant Motor Scales for correlation with CHASMS scores.

RESULTS:

CHASMS gross motor scores declined postoperatively in 64% (25 of 39). Lower CHASMS scores, after adjusting for age, were associated with longer duration of mechanical ventilation (p < 0.001) and ICU length of stay (p = 0.001). Gross motor CHASMS scores were significantly correlated with Test of Infant Motor Performance (r = 0.70, p < 0.001) and Alberta Infant Motor Scales scores (r = 0.88, p < 0.001).

CONCLUSIONS:

Motor impairments in infants after cardiac operations are common and may be exacerbated by longer intubation and prolonged exposure to the ICU environment. The feasibility, reliability, and validity of CHASMS were supported for the evaluation of motor skills in this at-risk population.

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[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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