Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2017 Mar 27;46(1):23. doi: 10.1186/s40463-017-0205-3.

Incidence and burden of comorbid pain and depression in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis awaiting endoscopic sinus surgery in Canada.

Author information

1
Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
2
Department of Surgery, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada.
3
Centre for Health Services and Policy Research, School of Population and Public Health, University of British Columbia, 201 - 2206 East Mall, V6T 1Z3, Vancouver, Canada.
4
Centre for Health Services and Policy Research, School of Population and Public Health, University of British Columbia, 201 - 2206 East Mall, V6T 1Z3, Vancouver, Canada. jason.sutherland@ubc.ca.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

This study sheds important light on the association between sino-nasal symptoms and global quality of life in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis waiting for endoscopic sinus surgery. Using patient-reported information collected pre-operatively, the primary objective was to report on patients' pre-surgical sino-nasal symptoms and their association with self-reported pain and depression. The secondary objective was to report on levels of depression and pain among patients in the sample reporting severe sleep problems.

METHODS:

This is a cross-sectional study of patient-reported outcomes collected prospectively from a cohort of 261 patients assigned to the wait list for elective endoscopic sinus surgery in a large urban region of Canada.

RESULTS:

Younger patients and patients with other medical comorbidities were most likely to report significant symptoms of chronic rhinosinusitis and substantial associated pain and depression. In the primary analyses, patients reporting significant symptoms of chronic rhinosinusitis were more likely to report moderate depression or high pain (pā€‰<ā€‰0.01). Subsequently, chronic rhinosinusitis patients with severe sleep problems were 82% likely to report moderate or severe depression and pain.

CONCLUSION:

Preoperative management of depression and pain may be considered in order to improve the health-related quality of life of patients waiting for ESS. As depression and pain were highly prevalent, patients with severe sleep problems may be candidates for prioritized access.

KEYWORDS:

Chronis sinusitis; Depression; Endoscopic sinus surgery; Pain; Patient-reported outcomes; Quality of life; Sleep

PMID:
28347329
PMCID:
PMC5369212
DOI:
10.1186/s40463-017-0205-3
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for BioMed Central Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center