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Ophthalmic Epidemiol. 2017 Dec;24(6):364-370. doi: 10.1080/09286586.2017.1296961. Epub 2017 Mar 27.

Presence of Vision Impairment and Risk of Hospitalization among Elderly Medicare Beneficiaries.

Author information

1
a Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania , Philadelphia , PA , USA.
2
b Center for Pharmacoepidemiology Research and Training, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania , Philadelphia , PA , USA.
3
c Department of Medicine , Medical College of Wisconsin , Milwaukee , WI , USA.
4
d Geriatric Psychiatry Section of the Department of Psychiatry , Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, and VISN 4 Mental Illness Research, Education and Clinical Center (MIRECC), Corporal Michael J. Crescenz VA Medical Center , Philadelphia , PA , USA.
5
e Department of Family Medicine and Community Health, Perelman School of Medicine , University of Pennsylvania , Philadelphia , PA , USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To examine the association between vision impairment and all-cause hospitalization among elderly Medicare beneficiaries.

METHODS:

A population-based study (N = 22,681) of community-dwelling Medicare beneficiaries aged 65 years and older who participated in the Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey for the years 2001-2007. Beneficiaries were classified into self-reported presence of vision impairment versus no vision impairment. Inpatient hospitalizations were identified using Medicare claims data. A multivariable Cox proportional hazard model examined the association between presence of vision impairment and time to first hospitalization within 3 years of survey entry after adjusting for sociodemographics, comorbidities, hearing impairment, and activity limitation stages derived from difficulty performing the activities of daily living.

RESULTS:

Medicare beneficiaries who self-reported the presence of vision impairment were significantly more likely to be hospitalized over 3 years compared to beneficiaries without vision impairment even after adjustment for potentially influential covariates (hazard ratio = 1.14 and 95% confidence interval: 1.05-1.23).

CONCLUSIONS:

Medicare beneficiaries with self-reported vision impairment were at higher risk of hospitalization during a 3-year period. Further research may identify reasons that are amenable to policy interventions.

KEYWORDS:

Access to care; Medicare; disability; elderly; hospitalization; visual disorders

PMID:
28346032
PMCID:
PMC5617761
DOI:
10.1080/09286586.2017.1296961
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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