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J Sports Sci Med. 2017 Mar 1;16(1):53-59. eCollection 2017 Mar.

Retrospective Injury Epidemiology and Risk Factors for Injury in CrossFit.

Author information

1
Florida International University , Miami, FL, USA.
2
Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center in Cincinnati , OH., USA.

Abstract

The objective of the study is to examine injury epidemiology and risk factors for injury in CrossFit athletes. A survey was administered to athletes at four owner-operated facilities in South Florida. Respondents reported number, location of injury, and training exposure from the preceding six months and answered questions regarding potential risk factors for injury. Fifty out of 191 athletes sustained 62 injuries during CrossFit participation in the preceding six months. The most frequently injured locations were the shoulder, knee, and lower back. Injury incidence was 2.3/1000 athlete training hours. Competitors were more likely to be injured (40% v 19%, p = 0.002) and had greater weekly athlete training hours (7.3 ± 7.0 v 4.9 ± 2.9, p < 0.001) than non-competitors. Athletes who reported injury also reported significantly higher values for the following risk factors: years of participation (2.7 ± 1.8 v 1.8 ± 1.5, p = 0.001), weekly athlete training hours (7.3 ± 3.8 v 4.9 ± 2.1, p = 0.020), weekly athlete-exposures (6.4 ± 3.8 v 4.7 ± 2.1, p = 0.003), height (1.72 ± 0.09 m v 1.68 ± 0.01 m, p = 0.011), and body mass (78.24 ± 16.86 kg v 72.91 ± 14.77 kg, p = 0.037). Injury rates during CrossFit and location of injuries were similar to those previously reported. Injury incidence was similar to related sports, including gymnastics and powerlifting. While being a competitor was related to injury, increased exposure and length of participation in CrossFit likely underlied this association. Specifically, increased exposure to training in the form of greater weekly athlete training hours and weekly participations may contribute to injury. Increased height and body mass were also related to injury which is likely reflective of increased load utilized during training. Further research is warranted to determine if biomechanical factors associated with greater height and ability to lift greater loads are modifiable factors that can be adapted to reduce the increase risk of injury during CrossFit.

KEYWORDS:

Incidence; exercise; prevalence; weight training

PMID:
28344451
PMCID:
PMC5358031

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