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Curr Probl Cancer. 2017 May - Jun;41(3):194-200. doi: 10.1016/j.currproblcancer.2017.01.002. Epub 2017 Feb 1.

Pediatric oncology enters an era of precision medicine.

Author information

1
Division of Cancer Treatment and Diagnosis, Clinical Investigations Branch, National Cancer Institute, Rockville, Maryland. Electronic address: Seibelnl@mail.nih.gov.
2
Department of Pediatric Oncology, Dana-Farber/Boston Children's Cancer Center and Blood Disorder Center, Boston, Massachusetts.
3
Texas Children's Cancer Center, Texas Children's Hospital, Houston, Texas; Division of Pediatric Hematology-Oncology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas.
4
Department of Pediatrics, Oregon Health & Science University, Papé Family Research Institute, Portland, Oregon; Knight Cancer Institute, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon.
5
Department of Pediatrics, Columbia University, New York, New York.
6
Division of Oncology, Children's National Health System, Washington, DC.
7
Department of Pediatrics, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas; Pauline Allen Gill Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders, Children's Health, Dallas, Texas.
8
Department of Pediatrics, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
9
Division of Cancer Treatment and Diagnosis, Investigational Drug Branch, National Cancer Institute, Rockville, Maryland.
10
Division of Cancer Treatment and Diagnosis, Cancer Diagnosis Program, National Cancer Institute, Rockville, Maryland.
11
Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas; Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas.

Abstract

With the use of high-throughput molecular profiling technologies, precision medicine trials are ongoing for adults with cancer. Similarly, there is an interest in how these techniques can be applied to tumors in children and adolescents to expand our understanding of the biology of pediatric cancers and evaluate the clinical implications of genomic testing for these patients. This article reviews the early studies in pediatric oncology showing the feasibility of this approach, describe the future plans to evaluate the clinical implications in a multicenter clinical trial and identify the challenges of applying genomics in this patient population.

KEYWORDS:

Adolescent and young adult cancer; Genomic profiling; Next-generation sequencing; Pediatric tumors; RNA sequencing; Whole-exome sequencing

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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