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Cell. 2017 Mar 23;169(1):6-12. doi: 10.1016/j.cell.2017.03.005.

Bedside Back to Bench: Building Bridges between Basic and Clinical Genomic Research.

Author information

1
National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. Electronic address: manolio@nih.gov.
2
Department of Genome Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA.
3
Department of Medical Informatics and Clinical Epidemiology, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR 97239, USA.
4
Program in Medical and Population Genetics, Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA; Analytic and Translational Genetics Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA.
5
National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA.
6
HudsonAlpha Institute for Biotechnology, Huntsville, AL 35806, USA.
7
Center for Genetic Medicine, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL 60611, USA.
8
DeBartolo Family Personalized Medicine Institute, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL 33612, USA.
9
Department of Medicine, Pharmacology, and Biomedical Informatics, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37203, USA.
10
Genomic Medicine Institute, Geisinger Health System, Danville, PA 17822, USA.
11
Division of Genetic Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37203, USA.
12
Institute for Genomic Medicine, The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, OH 43205, USA.
13
Rady Children's Institute for Genomic Medicine, San Diego, CA 92123, USA.
14
Department of Developmental Biology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA 1526, USA.
15
Rare and Orphan Disease Center, Jackson Laboratory for Mammalian Genetics, Bar Harbor, ME 04609, USA.
16
Divisions of Cardiovascular Medicine, Network Medicine and Genetics, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA 02115, USA.
17
Invitae Genetics Information and Testing Company, San Francisco, CA 94107, USA.
18
JM-USDA-Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging, Tufts University, Boston, MA 02111, USA.
19
The Jackson Laboratory for Genomic Medicine, Farmington, CT 06032, USA.
20
National Center for Biotechnology Information, National Library of Medicine, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA.
21
Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA 02115, USA; Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA; Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Chevy Chase, MD 20815, USA.
22
Section of Genetic Medicine, Department of Medicine, Institute for Genomics and Systems Biology, Center for Data Intensive Science, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637, USA.
23
The Jackson Laboratory for Mammalian Genetics, Bar Harbor, ME 04609, USA.
24
Department of Biology, University of Oregon, Portland, OR 97403, USA.

Abstract

Genome sequencing has revolutionized the diagnosis of genetic diseases. Close collaborations between basic scientists and clinical genomicists are now needed to link genetic variants with disease causation. To facilitate such collaborations, we recommend prioritizing clinically relevant genes for functional studies, developing reference variant-phenotype databases, adopting phenotype description standards, and promoting data sharing.

PMID:
28340351
PMCID:
PMC5511379
DOI:
10.1016/j.cell.2017.03.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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