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Int J Epidemiol. 2017 Oct 1;46(5):1465-1477. doi: 10.1093/ije/dyx007.

Fish and seafood consumption during pregnancy and the risk of asthma and allergic rhinitis in childhood: a pooled analysis of 18 European and US birth cohorts.

Author information

1
Department of Social Medicine, University of Crete, Heraklion, Greece.
2
NUTRIM School of Nutrition and Translational Research in Metabolism, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands.
3
Obesity Prevention Program, Department of Population Medicine, Harvard Medical School and Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute, Boston, MA, USA.
4
Spanish Consortium for Research in Epidemiology and Public Health (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain.
5
FISABIO-Universitat Jaume I-Universitat de València Joint Research Unit of Epidemiology and Environmental Health, Valencia, Spain.
6
Department of Clinical Epidemiology, University of Porto Medical School, Porto, Portugal.
7
EPIUnit - Institute of Public Health, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal.
8
Public Health Division of Gipuzkoa, Basque Government, San Sebastián, Spain.
9
Epidemiological Research in Environment, Reproduction and Child Development, University of Rennes I, Rennes, France.
10
Welten Institute, Open University of the Netherlands, Heerlen, The Netherlands.
11
Generation R Study Group, Erasmus MC, University Medical Centre Rotterdam, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
12
Department of Pediatrics, Erasmus MC, University Medical Centre Rotterdam, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
13
Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway.
14
Department of Biomedical and Neuromotor Sciences (DIBINEM), University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy.
15
Department of Epidemiology, Lazio Regional Health System, Rome, Italy.
16
Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
17
Environmental Risk and Health, Flemish Institute for Technological Research (VITO), Mol, Belgium.
18
Medical Research Council (MRC) Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK.
19
CAPHRI School for Public Health and Primary Care, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands.
20
Academic Collaborative Center for Public Health Limburg, Public Health Services, Geleen, The Netherlands.
21
Physiotherapy and Sports Science, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
22
Centre for Fetal Programming, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark.
23
Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.
24
Cancer Epidemiology Unit, University of Turin and CPO-Piemonte, Turin, Italy.
25
National Institute for Health Research (NIHR), University of Southampton and University Hospital, Southampton, UK.
26
Department of BiomedicalSciences, University of Antwerp, Antwerp, Belgium.
27
Department of Environmental Medicine, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
28
Faculty of Natural and Health Sciences, University of the Faroe Islands, Tórshavn, Faroe Islands.
29
ISGlobal, Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology (CREAL), Barcelona, Spain.
30
Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Pompeu Fabra University, Barcelona, Spain.
31
Department of Public Health, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
32
Centre for Nutrition, Prevention and Health Services, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven, The Netherlands.
33
IMIM Hospital del Mar Medicine Research Institute, Barcelona, Spain.

Abstract

Background:

It has been suggested that prenatal exposure to n-3 long-chain fatty acids protects against asthma and other allergy-related diseases later in childhood. The extent to which fish intake in pregnancy protects against child asthma and rhinitis symptoms remains unclear. We aimed to assess whether fish and seafood consumption in pregnancy is associated with childhood wheeze, asthma and allergic rhinitis.

Methods:

We pooled individual data from 60 774 mother-child pairs participating in 18 European and US birth cohort studies. Information on wheeze, asthma and allergic rhinitis prevalence was collected using validated questionnaires. The time periods of interest were: infancy (0-2 years), preschool age (3-4 years), and school age (5-8 years). We used multivariable generalized models to assess associations of fish and seafood (other than fish) consumption during pregnancy with child respiratory outcomes in cohort-specific analyses, with subsequent random-effects meta-analyses.

Results:

The median fish consumption during pregnancy ranged from 0.44 times/week in The Netherlands to 4.46 times/week in Spain. Maternal fish intake during pregnancy was not associated with offspring wheeze symptoms in any age group nor with the risk of child asthma [adjusted meta-analysis relative risk (RR) per 1-time/week = 1.01, 95% confidence interval 0.97-1.05)] and allergic rhinitis at school age (RR = 1.01, 0.99-1.03). These results were consistently found in further analyses by type of fish and seafood consumption and in sensitivity analyses.

Conclusion:

We found no evidence supporting a protective association of fish and seafood consumption during pregnancy with offspring symptoms of wheeze, asthma and allergic rhinitis from infancy to mid childhood.

KEYWORDS:

Wheezing; allergic rhinitis; asthma; children; fish; pregnancy; seafood

PMID:
28338907
DOI:
10.1093/ije/dyx007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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