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Genet Med. 2017 Sep;19(9):1007-1012. doi: 10.1038/gim.2017.4. Epub 2017 Mar 23.

Genetic susceptibility to bilateral tinnitus in a Swedish twin cohort.

Author information

1
Department of Psychosomatic Medicine, Center for Internal Medicine and Dermatology, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany.
2
Tinnitus Center, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany.
3
Otology & Neurotology Group CTS495, Department of Genomic Medicine, GENYO - Center for Genomics and Oncological Research-Pfizer, University of Granada, Junta de Andalucía, PTS, Granada, Spain.
4
Department of Mathematics, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
5
Experimental Audiology, Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
6
Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Biodemography, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
7
Department of ORL, Head and Neck Surgery, Research Laboratory, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany.
8
Department of Otolaryngology, Complejo Hospitalario Universidad de Granada (CHUGRA), ibs.granada, Granada, Spain.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Genetic contributions to tinnitus have been difficult to determine due to the heterogeneity of the condition and its broad etiology. Here, we evaluated the genetic and nongenetic influences on self-reported tinnitus from the Swedish Twin Registry (STR).

METHODS:

Cross-sectional data from the STR was obtained. Casewise concordance rates (the risk of one twin being affected given that his/her twin partner has tinnitus) were compared for monozygotic (MZ) and dizygotic (DZ) twin pairs (N = 10,464 concordant and discordant twin pairs) and heritability coefficients (the proportion of the total variance attributable to genetic factors) were calculated using biometrical model fitting procedures.

RESULTS:

Stratification of tinnitus cases into subtypes according to laterality (unilateral versus bilateral) revealed that heritability of bilateral tinnitus was 0.56; however, it was 0.27 for unilateral tinnitus. Heritability was greater in men (0.68) than in women (0.41). However, when female pairs younger than 40 years of age were selected, heritability of 0.62 was achieved with negligible effects of shared environment.

CONCLUSION:

Unlike unilateral tinnitus, bilateral tinnitus is influenced by genetic factors and might constitute a genetic subtype. Overall, our study provides the initial evidence for a tinnitus phenotype with a genetic influence.Genet Med advance online publication 23 March 2017.

PMID:
28333916
PMCID:
PMC5589979
DOI:
10.1038/gim.2017.4
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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