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Am J Nurs. 2017 Apr;117(4):44-52. doi: 10.1097/01.NAJ.0000515232.51795.fa.

Climate Change and Mental Health.

Author information

1
Janna Trombley is an instructor at Worcester State University, Worcester, MA. Stephanie Chalupka is a professor and associate dean for nursing at Worcester State University, Worcester, MA, and a visiting scientist at the Mid-Atlantic Center for Children's Health and the Environment, Georgetown University School of Nursing and Health Studies, Washington, DC. Laura Anderko is the Robert and Kathleen Scanlon Endowed Chair in Values Based Health Care and a professor at the Georgetown University School of Nursing and Health Studies, Washington, DC. Contact author: Janna Trombley, jtrombley@worcester.edu. The authors have disclosed no potential conflicts of interest, financial or otherwise.

Abstract

: Climate change is an enormous challenge for our communities, our country, and our world. Recently much attention has been paid to the physical impacts of climate change, including extreme heat events, droughts, extreme storms, and rising sea levels. However, much less attention has been paid to the psychological impacts. This article examines the likely psychological impacts of climate change, including anxiety, stress, and depression; increases in violence and aggression; and loss of community identity. Nurses can play a vital role in local and regional climate strategies by preparing their patients, health care facilities, and communities to effectively address the anticipated mental health impacts of climate change.

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[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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