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Arch Biochem Biophys. 1988 Mar;261(2):447-57.

Oxygen radical-mediated lipid peroxidation and inhibition of Ca2+-ATPase activity of cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum.

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1
Department of Medicine, Medical College of Virginia, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond 23298.

Abstract

Oxygen radicals have been implicated as important mediators of myocardial ischemic and reperfusion injury. A major product of oxygen radical formation is the highly reactive hydroxyl radical via a biological Fenton reaction. The sarcoplasmic reticulum is one of the major target organelles injured by this process. Using a oxygen radical generating system consisting of dihydroxyfumarate and Fe3+-ADP, we studied lipid peroxidation and Ca2+-ATPase of cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum. Incubation of sarcoplasmic reticulum with dihydroxyfumarate plus Fe3+-ADP significantly inhibited enzyme activity. Addition of superoxide dismutase, superoxide dismutase plus catalase (15 micrograms/ml) or iron chelator, deferoxamine (1.25-1000 microM) protected Ca2+-ATPase activity. Time course studies showed that this system inhibited enzyme activity in 7.5 to 10 min. Similar exposure of sarcoplasmic reticulum to dihydroxyfumarate plus Fe3+-ADP stimulated malondialdehyde formation. This effect was inhibited by superoxide dismutase, catalase, singlet oxygen, and hydroxyl radical scavengers. EPR spin-trapping with 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide verified production of the hydroxyl radical. The combination of dihydroxyfumarate and Fe3+-ADP resulted in a spectrum of hydroxyl radical spin trap adduct, which was abolished by ethanol, catalase, mannitol, and superoxide dismutase. The results demonstrate the role of oxygen radicals in causing inactivation of Ca2+-ATPase and inhibition of lipid peroxidation of the sarcoplasmic reticulum which could possibly be one of the important mechanisms of oxygen radical-mediated myocardial injury.

PMID:
2833166
DOI:
10.1016/0003-9861(88)90361-x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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