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J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2017 Oct 12;72(11):1575-1581. doi: 10.1093/gerona/glw343.

Prevalence and Clinical Correlates of Sarcopenia, Identified According to the EWGSOP Definition and Diagnostic Algorithm, in Hospitalized Older People: The GLISTEN Study.

Author information

1
Department of Medical Science, University of Ferrara, Ferrara, Italy.
2
Department of Translational Medical Sciences, University of Naples Federico II, Italy.
3
School of Medicine and Surgery, University of Milano-Bicocca, Italy.
4
Geriatric Unit, S. Gerardo Hospital, Monza, Italy.
5
Struttura Complessa Dipartimento Universitario Geriatria e Malattie Metaboliche dell'Osso, Città della Salute e della Scienza-Molinette, Torino, Italy.
6
Geriatrics and Geriatrics Emergency Care, Italian National Research Center on Aging (IRCCS-INRCA), Ancona, Italy.
7
Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Messina, Italy.
8
Research Unit of Medicine of Aging, Department of Experimental and Clinical Medicine, University of Florence, Italy.
9
Geriatric Intensive Care Unit, Department of Geriatrics and Medicine, Azienda Ospedaliero-Univesitaria Careggi, Florence, Italy.
10
Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Geriatric Rehabilitation Department, University of Parma, Parma, Italy.
11
UOC di Geriatria osp. SS. Trinità ASL 8 Cagliari, Italy.
12
Department of Medical, Surgical, Neurological, Metabolic and Geriatric Sciences, Second University of Naples, Italy.
13
Department of Medicine, Geriatrics Division, University of Verona, Verona, Italy.
14
Department of Geriatrics, Neurosciences and Orthopaedics, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome, Italy.
15
Center for Clinical Epidemiology, School of Medicine, University of Ferrara, Italy.

Erratum in

Abstract

Background:

Prevalence of sarcopenia is substantial in most geriatrics settings, but estimates vary greatly across studies because of difference in population characteristics, diagnostic criteria, and methods used to assess muscle mass, muscle strength, and physical performance. We investigated the feasibility of the European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People (EWGSOP) algorithm assessment in hospitalized older adults and analyzed prevalence and clinical correlates of sarcopenia.

Methods:

Cross-sectional analysis of 655 participants enrolled in a multicenter observational study of older adults admitted to 12 acute hospital wards in Italy. Sarcopenia was assessed as low skeletal mass index (kg/m2) plus either low handgrip strength or low walking speed (EWGSOP criteria). Skeletal muscle mass was estimated using bioimpedance analysis.

Results:

Of the 655 patients (age 81.0 ± 6.8 years; women 51.9%) enrolled in the study, 275 (40.2%) were not able to perform the 4-m walking test because of medical problems. The overall prevalence of sarcopenia on hospital admission was 34.7% (95% confidence interval 28-37) and it steeply increased with aging (p < .001). In multivariable analysis, patients with sarcopenia on hospital admission were older and were more likely to be male and to have congestive heart failure, cerebrovascular disease, and severe basic activities of daily living disability. The prevalence of sarcopenia was inversely correlated with body mass index.

Conclusion:

Based on EWGSOP criteria, prevalence of sarcopenia is extremely high among older adults on admission to acute hospital wards. Older age, male gender, congestive heart failure, cerebrovascular disease, severe activities of daily living disability, and body mass index were the clinical variables significantly associated with the presence of sarcopenia.

KEYWORDS:

Acute care; Hospital; Prevalence; Sarcopenia

PMID:
28329345
DOI:
10.1093/gerona/glw343
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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