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J Pain Symptom Manage. 2017 Jun;53(6):1042-1049.e3. doi: 10.1016/j.jpainsymman.2017.02.005. Epub 2017 Mar 16.

Validation of the Spanish Version of the Quality of Dying and Death Questionnaire (QODD-ESP) in a Home-Based Cancer Palliative Care Program and Development of the QODD-ESP-12.

Author information

1
Departamento Medicina Interna, Facultad de Medicina, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago, Chile; Programa Medicina Paliativa y Cuidados Continuos, Facultad de Medicina, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago, Chile. Electronic address: peperezc@gmail.com.
2
Departamento Salud Pública, Facultad de Medicina, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago, Chile.
3
Programa Medicina Paliativa y Cuidados Continuos, Facultad de Medicina, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago, Chile.
4
Departamento Pediatría, Facultad de Medicina, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago, Chile.
5
Unidad Cuidados Paliativos, Complejo Asistencial Dr. Sótero del Río, Servicio de Salud Metropolitano Sur Oriente, Puente Alto, Chile.
6
Escuela de Medicina, Facultad de Medicina, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago, Chile.
7
Departamento Medicina Interna, Facultad de Medicina, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago, Chile; Programa Medicina Paliativa y Cuidados Continuos, Facultad de Medicina, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago, Chile.

Abstract

CONTEXT:

Improving quality of death (QOD) is a key goal in palliative care (PC). To our knowledge, no instruments to measure QOD have been validated in Spanish.

OBJECTIVES:

The goals of this study were to validate the Spanish version of the quality of dying and death (QODD) questionnaire and to develop and validate a shortened version of this instrument by phone interview.

METHODS:

We enrolled caregivers (CGs) of consecutive deceased cancer patients who participated in a single PC clinic. CGs were contacted by phone between 4 and 12 weeks after patients' death and completed the Spanish QODD (QODD-ESP). A question assessing quality of life during last week of life was included. A 12-item QODD (QODD-ESP-12) was developed. Reliability, convergent validity, and construct validity were estimated for both versions.

RESULTS:

About 150 (50%) of 302 CGs completed the QODD-ESP. Patient's mean age (SD) was 67 (14); 71 (47%) were females, and 131 (87%) died at home. CGs' mean age (SD) was 51 (13); 128 (85%) were females. Mean QODD-ESP score was 69 (range 35-96). Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin measure of sampling adequacy was 0.322, not supporting the use of factorial analysis to assess the existence of an underlying construct. Mean QODD-ESP-12 score was 69 (range 31-97). Correlation with last week quality of life was 0.306 (P < 0.01). Confirmatory factorial analysis of QODD-ESP-12 showed that data fitted well Downey's four factors; Chi-square test = 6.32 (degrees of freedom = 60), P = 0.394 comparative fit index = 0.988; Tucker-Lewis Index = 0.987, and root mean square error of approximation = 0.016 (95% CI 0-0.052).

CONCLUSION:

QODD-ESP-12 is a reliable and valid instrument with good psychometric properties and can be used to assess QOD in a Spanish-speaking cancer PC population by phone interview.

KEYWORDS:

Quality of death; cancer; home care; palliative care; survey; telephone interview

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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