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J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol. 2017 Oct;173:28-32. doi: 10.1016/j.jsbmb.2017.03.013. Epub 2017 Mar 18.

High dose vitamin D may improve lower urinary tract symptoms in postmenopausal women.

Author information

1
Tromsø Endocrine Research Group, Institute of Clinical Medicine, UiT-The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
2
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University Hospital of North Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
3
Tromsø Endocrine Research Group, Institute of Clinical Medicine, UiT-The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway; Division of Internal Medicine, University Hospital of North Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
4
Cork Centre for Vitamin D and Nutrition Research, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences, Cork, Ireland; Department of Medicine, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland.
5
Tromsø Endocrine Research Group, Institute of Clinical Medicine, UiT-The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway; Division of Internal Medicine, University Hospital of North Norway, Tromsø, Norway. Electronic address: guri.grimnes@unn.no.

Abstract

Lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) are common in postmenopausal women, and have been reported inversely associated with vitamin D intake and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) levels. The aim of this study was to investigate if high dose vitamin D supplementation would affect LUTS in comparison to standard dose. In a randomized controlled study including 297 postmenopausal women with low bone mineral density, the participants were allocated to receive capsules of 20 000IU of vitamin D3 twice a week (high dose group) or similar looking placebo (standard dose group). In addition, all the participants received 1g of calcium and 800IU of vitamin D daily. A validated questionnaire regarding LUTS was filled in at baseline and after 12 months. At baseline, 76 women in the high dose group and 82 in the standard dose group reported any LUTS. Levels of serum 25(OH)D increased significantly more in the high dose group (from 64.7 to 164.1nmol/l compared to from 64.1 to 81.8nmol/l, p<0.01). No differences between the groups were seen regarding change in LUTS except for a statistically significant reduction in the reported severity of urine incontinence in the high dose group as compared to the standard dose group after one year (p<0.05). The results need confirmation in a study specifically designed for this purpose.

KEYWORDS:

Lower urinary tract symptoms; RCT; Urinary tract infection; Vitamin D

PMID:
28323043
DOI:
10.1016/j.jsbmb.2017.03.013
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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