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BMJ Open. 2017 Mar 20;7(3):e014153. doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2016-014153.

Cross-sectional survey on defensive practices and defensive behaviours among Israeli psychiatrists.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, Hadassah Hebrew University Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel.
2
Department of Health Systems Management, Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Israel.
3
Department of Psychology, Hebrew University, Jerusalem, Israel.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Psychiatry is a low-risk specialisation; however, there is a steady increase in malpractice claims against psychiatrists. Defensive psychiatry (DP) refers to any action undertaken by a psychiatrist to avoid malpractice liability that is not for the sole benefit of the patient's mental health and well-being. The objectives of this study were to assess the scope of DP practised by psychiatrists and to understand whether awareness of DP correlated with defensive behaviours.

METHODS:

A questionnaire was administered to 213 Israeli psychiatry residents and certified psychiatrists during May and June 2015 regarding demographic data and experience with malpractice claims, medicolegal literature and litigation. Four clinical scenarios represented defensive behaviours and reactions (feelings and actions) to malpractice claims.

RESULTS:

Forty-four (20.6%) certified psychiatrists and four (1.9%) residents were directly involved in malpractice claims, while 132 (62.1%) participants admitted to practising DP. Residents acknowledged the practice of DP more than did senior psychiatrists (p=0.038).Awareness of DP correlated with unnecessary hospitalisation of suicidal patients, increased unnecessary follow-up visits and prescribing smaller drug dosages than required for pregnant women and elderly patients.

CONCLUSIONS:

This study provides evidence that DP is well established in the routine clinical daily practice of psychiatrists. Further studies are needed to reveal whether DP effectively protects psychiatrists from malpractice suits or, rather, if it impedes providing quality psychiatric care and represents an economic burden that leads to more harm for the patient.

KEYWORDS:

Defensive Medicine; Defensive Psychiatry (DP); Medical Malpractice

PMID:
28320795
PMCID:
PMC5372095
DOI:
10.1136/bmjopen-2016-014153
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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