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Biomed Pharmacother. 2017 May;89:1297-1309. doi: 10.1016/j.biopha.2017.03.005. Epub 2017 Mar 17.

Asiatic acid ameliorates pulmonary fibrosis induced by bleomycin (BLM) via suppressing pro-fibrotic and inflammatory signaling pathways.

Author information

1
The Eastern Hospital of the First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510700, China. Electronic address: dongshuhongsysu@foxmail.com.
2
The Eastern Hospital of the First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510700, China.

Abstract

Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is known as a life-threatening disease with high mortality and limited therapeutic strategies. In addition, the molecular mechanism by which pulmonary fibrosis developed is not fully understood. Asiatic acid (AA) is a triterpenoid, isolated from Centella asiatica, exhibiting efficient anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative activities. In our study, we attempted to explore the effect of Asiatic acid on bleomycin (BLM)-induced pulmonary fibrosis in mice. The findings indicated that pre-treatment with Asiatic acid inhibited BLM-induced lung injury and fibrosis progression in mice. Further, Asiatic acid down-regulates inflammatory cells infiltration in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and pro-inflammatory cytokines expression in lung tissue specimens induced by BLM. Also, Asiatic acid apparently suppressed transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1) expression in tissues of lung, accompanied with Collagen I, Collagen III, α-SMA and matrix metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1 decreasing, as well as Smads and ERK1/2 inactivation. Of note, Asiatic acid reduces NOD-like receptor, pyrin domain containing-3 (NLRP3) inflammasome. The findings indicated that Asiatic acid might be an effective candidate for pulmonary fibrosis and inflammation treatment.

KEYWORDS:

Asiatic acid (AA); Bleomycin (BLM); Fibrosis; Inflammation; Pulmonary fibrosis

PMID:
28320097
DOI:
10.1016/j.biopha.2017.03.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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