Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Nat Chem Biol. 2017 May;13(5):537-543. doi: 10.1038/nchembio.2330. Epub 2017 Mar 20.

Metagenomic discovery of polybrominated diphenyl ether biosynthesis by marine sponges.

Author information

1
Center for Oceans and Human Health, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego.
2
Center for Marine Biotechnology and Biomedicine, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego.
3
Division of Biological Sciences, University of California, San Diego.
4
Department of Medicinal Chemistry, University of Utah, Salt Lake City.
5
Smithsonian Marine Station at Ft Pierce, Florida.
6
University of Guam Marine Laboratory, UoG Station, Guam.
7
Skaggs School for Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of California, San Diego.
#
Contributed equally

Abstract

Naturally produced polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) pervade the marine environment and structurally resemble toxic man-made brominated flame retardants. PBDEs bioaccumulate in marine animals and are likely transferred to the human food chain. However, the biogenic basis for PBDE production in one of their most prolific sources, marine sponges of the order Dysideidae, remains unidentified. Here, we report the discovery of PBDE biosynthetic gene clusters within sponge-microbiome-associated cyanobacterial endosymbionts through the use of an unbiased metagenome-mining approach. Using expression of PBDE biosynthetic genes in heterologous cyanobacterial hosts, we correlate the structural diversity of naturally produced PBDEs to modifications within PBDE biosynthetic gene clusters in multiple sponge holobionts. Our results establish the genetic and molecular foundation for the production of PBDEs in one of the most abundant natural sources of these molecules, further setting the stage for a metagenomic-based inventory of other PBDE sources in the marine environment.

PMID:
28319100
PMCID:
PMC5391271
DOI:
10.1038/nchembio.2330
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Nature Publishing Group Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center