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Pancreatology. 2017 May - Jun;17(3):329-333. doi: 10.1016/j.pan.2017.02.010. Epub 2017 Feb 17.

Lessons from a national audit of acute pancreatitis: A summary of the NCEPOD report 'Treat the Cause'.

Author information

1
National Confidential Enquiry into Patient Outcome and Death (NCEPOD), London, UK; Central Manchester University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, UK; School of Medical Sciences, University of Manchester, UK. Electronic address: doreilly@doctors.org.uk.
2
National Confidential Enquiry into Patient Outcome and Death (NCEPOD), London, UK; Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, UK.
3
National Confidential Enquiry into Patient Outcome and Death (NCEPOD), London, UK; The Ipswich Hospital NHS Trust, UK.
4
National Confidential Enquiry into Patient Outcome and Death (NCEPOD), London, UK.

Abstract

The National Confidential Enquiry into Patient Outcome and Death (NCEPOD) is an independent organisation whose remit is to review the quality of medical and surgical care provided in the United Kingdom. We undertook a review into the care provided to patients treated for acute pancreatitis during a 6 month study period between 1st January and 30th June 2014. This included assessment of care at an organisational level, clinical level within hospitals and external peer review. From a random sample, 712 patients underwent hospital clinician review and 418 patients had external peer review. Overall, we found that there was room for improvement in care in over 50% of patients with acute pancreatitis. Case reviewers felt that efforts to prevent recurrent episodes due to gallstones and alcohol were inadequate as 21% of patients in the study had one or more previous episodes of acute pancreatitis. Aspects of general care where improvements could be made include better antibiotic stewardship; as 1/5 of patients were considered to have been given antibiotics unnecessarily. Overall management of the patients' nutrition was considered adequate by the case reviewers in only 85% of cases. The use of an early warning score was omitted in 31% of emergency department admissions. Recommendations include standardised early warning scoring systems to be used throughout the hospital and commenced in the emergency department. The development of better networking arrangements and regional pancreatitis units, with shared management guidelines, is also essential to improve the coordination of care.

KEYWORDS:

Acute pancreatitis; Antibiotics; Early warning scores; Gallstones; Nutrition

PMID:
28318891
DOI:
10.1016/j.pan.2017.02.010
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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