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Schizophr Res. 2017 Dec;190:77-81. doi: 10.1016/j.schres.2017.03.022. Epub 2017 Mar 18.

Do paranoid delusions exist on a continuum with subclinical paranoia? A multi-method taxometric study.

Author information

1
University of Liverpool, Institute of Psychology, Health and Society, Waterhouse Building, Block B, Brownlow St, Liverpool L69 3GL, United Kingdom. Electronic address: hlaelahi@liverpool.ac.uk.
2
Lancaster University, Spectrum Centre for Mental Health Research, Furness Building C73, Lancaster LA1 4YG, United Kingdom. Electronic address: g.perezalgorta@lancaster.ac.uk.
3
University of Manchester, Division of Psychology and Mental Health, School of Health Sciences, Zochonis Building, Manchester M13 9PL, United Kingdom. Electronic address: filippo.varese@manchester.ac.uk.
4
University of Liverpool, Institute of Psychology, Health and Society, Waterhouse Building, Block B, Brownlow St, Liverpool L69 3GL, United Kingdom. Electronic address: j.mcintyre@liverpool.ac.uk.
5
University of Liverpool, Institute of Psychology, Health and Society, Waterhouse Building, Block B, Brownlow St, Liverpool L69 3GL, United Kingdom. Electronic address: rpb@liverpool.ac.uk.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

There is widespread interest in whether psychosis exists on a continuum with healthy functioning. Previous research has implied that paranoia, a common symptom of psychosis, exists on a continuum but this has not been investigated using samples including both patients and non-patients and up-to-date taxometric methods.

AIM:

To assess the latent structure of paranoia in a diverse sample using taxometric methods.

METHOD:

We obtained data from 2836 participants, including the general population as well as at-risk mental state and psychotic patients using the P-scale of the Paranoia and Deservedness Scale. Data were analysed using three taxometric procedures, MAMBAC, MAXEIG and L-MODE (Ruscio, 2016), and two sets of paranoia indicators (subscales and selected items from the P scale), including and excluding the patient groups.

RESULTS:

Eleven of the twelve analyses supported a dimensional model. Using the full sample and subscales as indicators, the MAMBAC analysis was ambiguous. Overall, the findings converged on a dimensional latent structure.

CONCLUSIONS:

A dimensional latent structure of paranoia implies that the processes involved in sub-clinical paranoia may be similar to those in clinical paranoia.

KEYWORDS:

Dimensional; L-MODE; MAMBAC; MAXEIG; Paranoia; Taxometrics

PMID:
28318838
DOI:
10.1016/j.schres.2017.03.022
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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