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J Stud Alcohol Drugs. 2017 Mar;78(2):195-202.

A Multi-Country Study of Harms to Children Because of Others' Drinking.

Author information

1
National Drug Research Institute, Curtin University, (Melbourne Office), Australia.
2
Centre for Alcohol Policy Research, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia.
3
School of Population and Global Health, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia.
4
International Health Policy Program, Bangkok, Thailand.
5
Health Strategy and Policy Institute, Hanoi, Vietnam.
6
Universidad del Desarrollo, Santiago, Chile.
7
University of Colombo, Colombo, Sri Lanka.
8
University of Uyo, Uyo, Nigeria.
9
National Institute of Public Health, Vientiane, Lao PDR.
10
Centre for Research and Information on Substance Abuse and United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, Uyo, Nigeria.
11
Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland.
12
Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Centralförbundet för Alcohol och Narkotikaupplysning (CAN), Sweden.
13
World Health Organization.
14
Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SORAD), Stockholm University, Sweden.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This study aims to ascertain and compare the prevalence and correlates of alcohol-related harms to children cross-nationally.

METHOD:

National and regional sample surveys of randomly selected households included 7,848 carers (4,223 women) from eight countries (Australia, Chile, Ireland, Lao People's Democratic Republic [PDR], Nigeria, Sri Lanka, Thailand, and Vietnam). Country response rates ranged from 35% to 99%. Face-to-face or telephone surveys asking about harm from others' drinking to children ages 0-17 years were conducted, including four specific harms: that because of others' drinking in the past year children had been (a) physically hurt, (b) verbally abused, (c) exposed to domestic violence, or (d) left unsupervised.

RESULTS:

The prevalence of alcohol-related harms to children varied from a low of 4% in Lao PDR to 14% in Vietnam. Alcohol-related harms to children were reported by a substantial minority of families in most countries, with only Lao PDR and Nigeria reporting significantly lower levels of harm. Alcohol-related harms to children were dispersed sociodemographically and were concentrated in families with heavy drinkers.

CONCLUSIONS:

Family-level drinking patterns were consistently identified as correlates of harm to children because of others' drinking, whereas sociodemographic factors showed few obvious correlations.

PMID:
28317499
PMCID:
PMC5554100
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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