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J Immunol Res. 2017;2017:4541958. doi: 10.1155/2017/4541958. Epub 2017 Feb 20.

Sildenafil Can Affect Innate and Adaptive Immune System in Both Experimental Animals and Patients.

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1
Department of Clinical Immunology, Institute of Transplantology, Medical University of Warsaw, Nowogrodzka 59, 02-006 Warsaw, Poland.

Abstract

Sildenafil, a type 5 phosphodiesterase inhibitor (PDE5-I), is primarily used for treating erectile dysfunction. Sildenafil inhibits the degradation of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) by competing with cGMP for binding site of PDE5. cGMP is a secondary messenger activating protein kinases and a common regulator of ion channel conductance, glycogenolysis, and cellular apoptosis. PDE5 inhibitors (PDE-Is) found application in cardiology, nephrology, urology, dermatology, oncology, and gynecology. Positive result of sildenafil treatment is closely connected with its immunomodulatory effects. Sildenafil influences angiogenesis, platelet activation, proliferation of regulatory T cells, and production of proinflammatory cytokines and autoantibodies. Sildenafil action in humans and animals appears to be different. Surprisingly, it also acts differently in males and females organisms. Although the immunomodulatory effects of PDE5 inhibitors appear to be promising, none of them reached the point of being tested in clinical trials. Data on the influence of selective PDE5-Is on the human immune system are limited. The main objective of this review is to discuss the immunomodulatory effects of sildenafil in both patients and experimental animals. This is the first review of the current state of knowledge about the effects of sildenafil on the immune system.

PMID:
28316997
PMCID:
PMC5337856
DOI:
10.1155/2017/4541958
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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