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Curr Hypertens Rep. 2017 Apr;19(4):25. doi: 10.1007/s11906-017-0722-5.

Microbial Short-Chain Fatty Acids and Blood Pressure Regulation.

Author information

1
Department of Physiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 725 N Wolfe St, WBSB 205, Baltimore, MD, 21205, USA. jpluznick@jhmi.edu.

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW:

Microbial short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) are byproducts of microbial metabolism which can be absorbed into the bloodstream of the host, where they exert effects on host physiology. SCFAs have been known to influence several aspects of host physiology, including the regulation of blood pressure. In this review, we will consider recent studies linking SCFAs to blood pressure regulation.

RECENT FINDINGS:

Several recent studies have found that changes in blood pressure often coordinate with expected changes in SCFAS. Efforts are now well underway to dissect and better understand this potential connection. One way that SCFAs can influence host cells is by interacting with host GPCRs, including Gpr41 and Olfr78, among others. Intriguingly, mice null for Olfr78 are hypotensive, whereas mice null for Gpr41 are hypertensive, implying that these pathways may be physiologically important links between SCFAs and host blood pressure control. In sum, these studies demonstrate that there does indeed appear to be a link between SCFAs and blood pressure, which likely involves host GPCRs, at least in part; however, the details and intricacies of these interactions are not yet fully understood and will greatly benefit from further studies.

KEYWORDS:

Blood pressure; Gpr41; Gut microbiome; Hypertension; Olfr78; SCFAs

PMID:
28315048
PMCID:
PMC5584783
DOI:
10.1007/s11906-017-0722-5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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