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Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2017 Apr;26(4):597-606. doi: 10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-16-0796. Epub 2017 Mar 17.

Body Size Indicators and Risk of Gallbladder Cancer: Pooled Analysis of Individual-Level Data from 19 Prospective Cohort Studies.

Author information

1
Epidemiology Research Program, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, Georgia. peter.campbell@cancer.org.
2
Epidemiology Research Program, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, Georgia.
3
Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland.
4
Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts.
5
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Insitutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
6
Division of Cancer Etiology, Department of Population Sciences, Beckman Research Institute of the City of Hope, Duarte, California.
7
Divisions of Preventive Medicine and Aging, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts.
8
Department of Epidemiology, Shanghai Cancer Institute, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, P.R. China.
9
Cancer Epidemiology Centre, Cancer Council Victoria, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; and Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
10
Section of Nutrition and Metabolism, International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC-WHO), Lyon, France.
11
Department of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Milken Institute School of Public Health, George Washington University, Washington, DC.
12
Epidemiology Branch, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Institutes of Health/Department of Health and Human Services, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina.
13
Division of Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee.
14
Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø, The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
15
Department of Research, Cancer Registry of Norway, Institute of Population-Based Cancer Research, Oslo, Norway.
16
Genetic Epidemiology Group, Samfundet Folkhälsan, Research Center Helsinki, Finland.
17
Department of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
18
Department of Population Health, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York.

Abstract

Background: There are few established risk factors for gallbladder cancer beyond gallstones. Recent studies suggest a higher risk with high body mass index (BMI), an indicator of general heaviness, but evidence from other body size measures is lacking.Methods: Associations of adult BMI, young adult BMI, height, adult weight gain, waist circumference (WC), waist-height ratio (WHtR), hip circumference (HC), and waist-hip ratio (WHR) with gallbladder cancer risk were evaluated. Individual-level data from 1,878,801 participants in 19 prospective cohort studies (14 studies had circumference measures) were harmonized and included in this analysis. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression estimated hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI).Results: After enrollment, 567 gallbladder cancer cases were identified during 20.1 million person-years of observation, including 361 cases with WC measures. Higher adult BMI (per 5 kg/m2, HR: 1.24; 95% CI, 1.13-1.35), young adult BMI (per 5 kg/m2, HR: 1.12; 95% CI, 1.00-1.26), adult weight gain (per 5 kg, HR: 1.07; 95% CI, 1.02-1.12), height (per 5 cm, HR: 1.10; 95% CI, 1.03-1.17), WC (per 5 cm, HR: 1.09; 95% CI, 1.02-1.17), WHtR (per 0.1 unit, HR: 1.24; 95% CI, 1.00-1.54), and HC (per 5 cm, HR: 1.13; 95% CI, 1.04-1.22), but not WHR (per 0.1 unit, HR: 1.03; 95% CI, 0.87-1.22), were associated with higher risks of gallbladder cancer, and results did not differ meaningfully by sex or other demographic/lifestyle factors.Conclusions: These findings indicate that measures of overall and central excess body weight are associated with higher gallbladder cancer risks.Impact: Excess body weight is an important, and potentially preventable, gallbladder cancer risk factor. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(4); 597-606. ©2017 AACR.

PMID:
28314823
PMCID:
PMC5380577
DOI:
10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-16-0796
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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