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J Physiol. 2017 May 15;595(10):3063-3075. doi: 10.1113/JP272844. Epub 2017 Apr 21.

Molecular mechanisms of tumour invasion: regulation by calcium signals.

Author information

1
Inserm U1003, Laboratory of Excellence, Ion Channels Science and Therapeutics, Equipe Labellisée par la Ligue Nationale Contre le Cancer, SIRIC ONCOLille, University of Lille, 59656, Villeneuve d'Ascq, France.
2
Department of Life Science and Systems Biology, University of Torino, Torino, Italy.

Abstract

Intracellular calcium (Ca2+ ) signals are key regulators of multiple cellular functions, both healthy and physiopathological. It is therefore unsurprising that several cancers present a strong Ca2+ homeostasis deregulation. Among the various hallmarks of cancer disease, a particular role is played by metastasis, which has a critical impact on cancer patients' outcome. Importantly, Ca2+ signalling has been reported to control multiple aspects of the adaptive metastatic cancer cell behaviour, including epithelial-mesenchymal transition, cell migration, local invasion and induction of angiogenesis (see Abstract Figure). In this context Ca2+ signalling is considered to be a substantial intracellular tool that regulates the dynamicity and complexity of the metastatic cascade. In the present study we review the spatial and temporal organization of Ca2+ fluxes, as well as the molecular mechanisms involved in metastasis, analysing the key steps which regulate initial tumour spread.

KEYWORDS:

calcium channel; calcium signalling; cancer cells

PMID:
28304082
PMCID:
PMC5430231
DOI:
10.1113/JP272844
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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