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Sci Rep. 2017 Mar 17;7:44521. doi: 10.1038/srep44521.

Effect of 1.8 GHz radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation on novel object associative recognition memory in mice.

Author information

1
State Key Laboratory of Medical Neurobiology, School of Life Sciences and Institutes of Brain Science, Fudan University, Shanghai, 200433, China.
2
Physics department, East China Normal University, Shanghai, 200241, China.

Abstract

Mounting evidence suggests that exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation (RF-EMR) can influence learning and memory in rodents. In this study, we examined the effects of single exposure to 1.8 GHz RF-EMR for 30 min on subsequent recognition memory in mice, using the novel object recognition task (NORT). RF-EMR exposure at an intensity of >2.2 W/kg specific absorption rate (SAR) power density induced a significant density-dependent increase in NORT index with no corresponding changes in spontaneous locomotor activity. RF-EMR exposure increased dendritic-spine density and length in hippocampal and prefrontal cortical neurons, as shown by Golgi staining. Whole-cell recordings in acute hippocampal and medial prefrontal cortical slices showed that RF-EMR exposure significantly altered the resting membrane potential and action potential frequency, and reduced the action potential half-width, threshold, and onset delay in pyramidal neurons. These results demonstrate that exposure to 1.8 GHz RF-EMR for 30 min can significantly increase recognition memory in mice, and can change dendritic-spine morphology and neuronal excitability in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. The SAR in this study (3.3 W/kg) was outside the range encountered in normal daily life, and its relevance as a potential therapeutic approach for disorders associated with recognition memory deficits remains to be clarified.

PMID:
28303965
PMCID:
PMC5355939
DOI:
10.1038/srep44521
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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