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Acta Otolaryngol. 2017 Sep;137(9):968-974. doi: 10.1080/00016489.2017.1300941. Epub 2017 Mar 16.

A six-month analysis of frontal sinus drainage pathway in patients with frontal sinusitis after balloon sinuplasty.

Author information

1
a Department of Otolaryngology , Division of Cranio- Maxillo- Facial Surgery, Military Institute of Medicine , Warsaw , Poland.
2
b Polish Academy of Sciences , Institute of Computer Science , Warsaw , Poland.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The balloon catheter has been used for a decade to dilate paranasal sinus outflow tracts. The question is: how wide and how durable is the dilation of drainage pathways in patients in long-term observations after this procedure?

OBJECTIVE:

The objective of our study was to observe the changes occurring in the frontal sinus drainage pathway (FSDP) in patients with frontal sinusitis at least 6 months after surgery using balloon catheters in an isolated procedure.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

We analyzed and measured the FSDP width on computed tomography (CT) of 23 images before and after the use of balloon catheters. We also assessed mucosal changes using Zinreich's scale, and symptom improvements with the Sino-Nasal Outcome Test (SNOT-20).

RESULTS:

A statistically significant difference in the width of the FSDP was found before and after sinuplasty in the study group (p ≤ .0016). On average, the FSDP increased by 24.1%. Clinically meaningful and statistically significant (p ≤ .0002) symptom improvement as indicated by the mean SNOT-20 score was observed. Mucosal changes were also statistically significant (p ≤ .0018) after surgery.

CONCLUSION:

The findings at least 6 months after follow-up indicated that the use of balloon catheters in an isolated procedure allowed durable modeling of FSDP and was associated with radiological and clinical improvements.

KEYWORDS:

Frontal Sinusitis; balloon catheter; frontal sinus drainage pathway; outcomes

PMID:
28301960
DOI:
10.1080/00016489.2017.1300941
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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