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Sci Rep. 2017 Mar 16;7:44522. doi: 10.1038/srep44522.

Practical whole-tooth restoration utilizing autologous bioengineered tooth germ transplantation in a postnatal canine model.

Author information

1
Department of Oral Rehabilitation and Regenerative Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama University, Okayama, 700-8525, Japan.
2
Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama University, Okayama, 700-8525, Japan.
3
Research Institute for Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science, Noda, Chiba, 278-8510, Japan.
4
RIKEN Center for Developmental Biology, Kobe, Hyogo, 650-0047, Japan.
5
Organ Technologies Inc., Tokyo, 105-0001, Japan.
6
Department of Fixed Prosthodontics, Osaka University Graduate School of Dentistry, Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871, Japan.
7
Department of Orthodontics, Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama University, Okayama, 700-8525, Japan.
8
Division of Pediatric Dentistry, Tohoku University Graduate School of Dentistry, Sendai, Miyagi, 980-8575, Japan.
9
Section of Oral Implantology and Regenerative Dental Medicine, Graduate School of Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-8549, Japan.
10
Section of Oral Pathology, Department of Oral Restitution, Graduate School of Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo, 113-8549, Japan.
11
Oral Health Science Center, Tokyo Dental College, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo, 101-0061, Japan.

Abstract

Whole-organ regeneration has great potential for the replacement of dysfunctional organs through the reconstruction of a fully functional bioengineered organ using three-dimensional cell manipulation in vitro. Recently, many basic studies of whole-tooth replacement using three-dimensional cell manipulation have been conducted in a mouse model. Further evidence of the practical application to human medicine is required to demonstrate tooth restoration by reconstructing bioengineered tooth germ using a postnatal large-animal model. Herein, we demonstrate functional tooth restoration through the autologous transplantation of bioengineered tooth germ in a postnatal canine model. The bioengineered tooth, which was reconstructed using permanent tooth germ cells, erupted into the jawbone after autologous transplantation and achieved physiological function equivalent to that of a natural tooth. This study represents a substantial advancement in whole-organ replacement therapy through the transplantation of bioengineered organ germ as a practical model for future clinical regenerative medicine.

PMID:
28300208
PMCID:
PMC5353657
DOI:
10.1038/srep44522
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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