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Stem Cells. 2017 May;35(5):1303-1315. doi: 10.1002/stem.2613.

Electroacupuncture Promotes Central Nervous System-Dependent Release of Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

Author information

1
Genetics Institute, Gainesville, Florida, USA.
2
College of Medicine, Gainesville, Florida, USA.
3
Department of Ophthalmology, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA.
4
Wells Center for Pediatric Research, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA.
5
Department of Anesthesia, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA.
6
Richard L. Roudebush VA Medical Center, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA.
7
Department of Biostatistics, Gainesville, Florida, USA.
8
Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, USA.
9
Krannert Institute of Cardiology, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA.
10
Indiana Center for Vascular Biology and Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA.
11
Department of Psychiatry, McKnight Brain Institute, Gainesville, Florida, USA.
12
Department of Physical Therapy, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA.
13
Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center, Indiana University, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA.
14
Scripps Clinic Medical Group, Scripps Center for Organ and Cell Transplantation, La Jolla, California, USA.
15
Mainland Acupuncture Center, Gainesville, Florida, USA.
16
College of Veterinary Medicine, Chon Buk National University, Jeonju, South Korea.
17
McDavitt Veterinary Clinic, Zionsville, Indiana, USA.
18
Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Gainesville, Florida, USA.
19
Department of Psychiatry, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA.
20
Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA.
21
Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA.
22
Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, Gainesville, Florida, USA.
23
School of Medicine, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Sichuan, China.
24
The Brown Foundation, Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston, Texas, USA.
25
Department of Radiation Oncology, College of Medicine, Gainesville, Florida, USA.
26
Department of Neuroscience, Center of Sensory Biology, the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.
27
College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, USA.

Abstract

Electroacupuncture (EA) performed in rats and humans using limb acupuncture sites, LI-4 and LI-11, and GV-14 and GV-20 (humans) and Bai-hui (rats) increased functional connectivity between the anterior hypothalamus and the amygdala and mobilized mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) into the systemic circulation. In human subjects, the source of the MSC was found to be primarily adipose tissue, whereas in rodents the tissue sources were considered more heterogeneous. Pharmacological disinhibition of rat hypothalamus enhanced sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activation and similarly resulted in a release of MSC into the circulation. EA-mediated SNS activation was further supported by browning of white adipose tissue in rats. EA treatment of rats undergoing partial rupture of the Achilles tendon resulted in reduced mechanical hyperalgesia, increased serum interleukin-10 levels and tendon remodeling, effects blocked in propranolol-treated rodents. To distinguish the afferent role of the peripheral nervous system, phosphoinositide-interacting regulator of transient receptor potential channels (Pirt)-GCaMP3 (genetically encoded calcium sensor) mice were treated with EA acupuncture points, ST-36 and LIV-3, and GV-14 and Bai-hui and resulted in a rapid activation of primary sensory neurons. EA activated sensory ganglia and SNS centers to mediate the release of MSC that can enhance tissue repair, increase anti-inflammatory cytokine production and provide pronounced analgesic relief. Stem Cells 2017;35:1303-1315.

KEYWORDS:

Adult stem cells; Mesenchymal stem cells; Nervous system; Neurones

PMID:
28299842
PMCID:
PMC5530374
DOI:
10.1002/stem.2613
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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