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Neurogastroenterol Motil. 2017 Oct;29(10):1-9. doi: 10.1111/nmo.13056. Epub 2017 Mar 13.

Assessing the colonic microbiome, hydrogenogenic and hydrogenotrophic genes, transit and breath methane in constipation.

Author information

1
Division of Nutritional Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, USA.
2
Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA.
3
Division of Biomedical Statistics and Informatics, Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA.
4
Clinical Research and Trials Unit, Center for Clinical and Translational Science, Rochester, MN, USA.
5
Microbiome Program, Center for Individualized Medicine, Rochester, MN, USA.
6
Carl R. Woese Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Differences in the gut microbiota and breath methane production have been observed in chronic constipation, but the relationship between colonic microbiota, transit, and breath tests remains unclear.

METHODS:

In 25 healthy and 25 constipated females we evaluated the sigmoid colonic mucosal and fecal microbiota using 16S rRNA gene sequencing, abundance of hydrogenogenic FeFe (FeFe-hydA) and hydrogenotrophic (methyl coenzyme M reductase A [mrcA] and dissimilatory sulfite reductase A [dsrA]) genes with real-time qPCR assays, breath hydrogen and methane levels after oral lactulose, and colonic transit with scintigraphy.

KEY RESULTS:

Breath hydrogen and methane were not correlated with constipation, slow colon transit, or with abundance of corresponding genes. After adjusting for colonic transit, the abundance of FeFehydA, dsrA, and mcrA were greater (P<.005) in colonic mucosa, but not stool, of constipated patients. The abundance of the selected functional gene targets also correlated with that of selected taxa. The colonic mucosal abundance of FeFe-hydA, but not mcrA, correlated positively (P<.05) with breath methane production, slow colonic transit, and overall microbiome composition. In the colonic mucosa and feces, the abundance of hydrogenogenic and hydrogenotrophic genes were positively correlated (P<.05). Breath methane production was not associated with constipation or colonic transit.

CONCLUSIONS & INFERENCES:

Corroborating our earlier findings with 16S rRNA genes, colonic mucosal but not fecal hydrogenogenic and hydrogenotrophic genes were more abundant in constipated vs. healthy subjects independent of colonic transit. Breath gases do not directly reflect the abundance of target genes contributing to their production.

KEYWORDS:

breath hydrogen; breath methane; constipation; genes; hydrogen; lactulose; methane; microbiome; microbiota; transit

PMID:
28295896
PMCID:
PMC5593760
DOI:
10.1111/nmo.13056
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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