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Int J Mol Sci. 2017 Mar 15;18(3). pii: E634. doi: 10.3390/ijms18030634.

Phosphoinositides, Major Actors in Membrane Trafficking and Lipid Signaling Pathways.

Author information

1
Department of Molecular and Cellular Genetics, Université de Strasbourg, CNRS, GMGM UMR 7156, F-67000 Strasbourg, France. johan-owen.decraene@univ-tours.fr.
2
Department of Molecular and Cellular Genetics, Université de Strasbourg, CNRS, GMGM UMR 7156, F-67000 Strasbourg, France. dimitri.bertazzi@gmail.com.
3
Department of Molecular and Cellular Genetics, Université de Strasbourg, CNRS, GMGM UMR 7156, F-67000 Strasbourg, France. sbar@unistra.fr.
4
Department of Molecular and Cellular Genetics, Université de Strasbourg, CNRS, GMGM UMR 7156, F-67000 Strasbourg, France. s.friant@unistra.fr.

Abstract

Phosphoinositides are lipids involved in the vesicular transport of proteins and lipids between the different compartments of eukaryotic cells. They act by recruiting and/or activating effector proteins and thus are involved in regulating various cellular functions, such as vesicular budding, membrane fusion and cytoskeleton dynamics. Although detected in small concentrations in membranes, their role is essential to cell function, since imbalance in their concentrations is a hallmark of many cancers. Their synthesis involves phosphorylating/dephosphorylating positions D3, D4 and/or D5 of their inositol ring by specific lipid kinases and phosphatases. This process is tightly regulated and specific to the different intracellular membranes. Most enzymes involved in phosphoinositide synthesis are conserved between yeast and human, and their loss of function leads to severe diseases (cancer, myopathy, neuropathy and ciliopathy).

KEYWORDS:

kinase; lipids; membrane trafficking; phosphatase; phosphoinositides; vesicles

PMID:
28294977
PMCID:
PMC5372647
DOI:
10.3390/ijms18030634
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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