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Development. 2017 Mar 15;144(6):952-957. doi: 10.1242/dev.140707.

Using brain organoids to understand Zika virus-induced microcephaly.

Qian X1,2, Nguyen HN1,3, Jacob F1,4, Song H1,2,3,4,5, Ming GL6,2,3,4,5,7.

Author information

1
Institute for Cell Engineering, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA.
2
Biomedical Engineering Graduate Program, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA.
3
Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA.
4
The Solomon H. Snyder Department of Neuroscience, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA.
5
The Kavli Neuroscience Discovery Institute, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA.
6
Institute for Cell Engineering, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA gming1@jhmi.edu.
7
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA.

Abstract

Technologies to differentiate human pluripotent stem cells into three-dimensional organized structures that resemble in vivo organs are pushing the frontiers of human disease modeling and drug development. In response to the global health emergency posed by the Zika virus (ZIKV) outbreak, brain organoids engineered to mimic the developing human fetal brain have been employed to model ZIKV-induced microcephaly. Here, we discuss the advantages of brain organoids over other model systems to study development and highlight recent advances in understanding ZIKV pathophysiology and its underlying pathogenesis mechanisms. We further discuss perspectives on overcoming limitations of current organoid systems for their future use in ZIKV research.

KEYWORDS:

Cortex; Microcephaly; Organoids; Zika; iPSC

PMID:
28292840
PMCID:
PMC5358105
DOI:
10.1242/dev.140707
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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