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Fertil Steril. 2017 Apr;107(4):1061-1069.e1. doi: 10.1016/j.fertnstert.2017.01.015. Epub 2017 Mar 11.

In vitro effects of phthalate esters in human myometrial and leiomyoma cells and increased urinary level of phthalate metabolite in women with uterine leiomyoma.

Author information

1
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul, South Korea.
2
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul, South Korea. Electronic address: kimsung@amc.seoul.kr.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate the possible role of phthalate, a ubiquitous chemical used in consumer products, in the pathogenesis of uterine leiomyoma.

DESIGN:

Experimental and prospective case-control study using human samples.

SETTING:

University hospital.

PATIENT(S):

Fifty-three women with histologic evidence of uterine leiomyoma and 33 surgical controls without leiomyoma.

INTERVENTION(S):

Human myometrial and leiomyoma cells were treated with di-(2-thylhexyl)-phthalate (DEHP).

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S):

Cell viability assay and Western blot analyses after in vitro DEHP treatment; high-performance liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry in cases and controls.

RESULT(S):

In vitro treatment with DEHP led to an increased viability and increased expressions of proliferating cell nuclear antigen, B-cell lymphoma 2 protein, and type I collagen in myometrial and leiomyoma cells. The urinary concentration of mono-(2-ethyl-5-carboxypentyl) phthalate was higher in women with leiomyoma compared with controls.

CONCLUSION(S):

These findings suggest that exposure to phthalate may play a role in the pathogenesis of uterine leiomyoma by enhancing proliferative activity, exerting an antiapoptotic effect, and increasing collagen contents in myometrial and leiomyoma cells.

KEYWORDS:

Endocrine disruptor; leiomyoma; myometrium; pathogenesis; phthalate

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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