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Lancet Infect Dis. 2017 May;17(5):e144-e158. doi: 10.1016/S1473-3099(16)30532-1. Epub 2017 Mar 11.

Effectiveness of interventions for diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis in hard-to-reach populations in countries of low and medium tuberculosis incidence: a systematic review.

Author information

1
Center of Tropical Medicine and Travel Medicine, Department of Infectious Diseases, Division of Internal Medicine, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
2
Medical Library, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands; Cochrane Netherlands, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands.
3
National Institute for Health and Care Excellence, Piccadilly Plaza, Manchester, UK.
4
National Institute for Health and Care Excellence, Piccadilly Plaza, Manchester, UK; Health Services Research, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK.
5
Division of Infection and Immunity, University College London, London, UK; National Institute for Health Research University College London Hospitals Biomedical Research Centre, London, UK.
6
European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control, Solna, Sweden.
7
European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control, Solna, Sweden. Electronic address: marieke.vanderwerf@ecdc.europa.eu.

Abstract

Tuberculosis is over-represented in hard-to-reach (underserved) populations in high-income countries of low tuberculosis incidence. The mainstay of tuberculosis care is early detection of active tuberculosis (case finding), contact tracing, and treatment completion. We did a systematic review with a scoping component of relevant studies published between 1990 and 2015 to update and extend previous National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) reviews on the effectiveness of interventions for identifying and managing tuberculosis in hard-to-reach populations. The analyses showed that tuberculosis screening by (mobile) chest radiography improved screening coverage and tuberculosis identification, reduced diagnostic delay, and was cost-effective among several hard-to-reach populations. Sputum culture for pre-migration screening and active referral to a tuberculosis clinic improved identification. Furthermore, monetary incentives improved tuberculosis identification and management among drug users and homeless people. Enhanced case management, good cooperation between services, and directly observed therapy improved treatment outcome and compliance. Strong conclusions cannot be drawn because of the heterogeneity of evidence with regard to study population, methodology, and quality.

PMID:
28291722
DOI:
10.1016/S1473-3099(16)30532-1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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