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Bone Marrow Transplant. 2017 Jun;52(6):811-817. doi: 10.1038/bmt.2017.34. Epub 2017 Mar 13.

Use of haploidentical stem cell transplantation continues to increase: the 2015 European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplant activity survey report.

Author information

1
EBMT Activity Survey Office, Division of Hematology, Department of Medicine, University Hospital, Basel, Switzerland.
2
Klinik für Kinder- und Jugendmedizin, Klinikum der Johann-Wolfgang, Goethe-Universität, Frankfurt am Main, Germany.
3
Università Vita-Salute San Raffaele, Milan, Italy.
4
Servicio de Hematologia y Hemoterapia, Hospital Universitario Puerta de Hierro, Madrid, Spain.
5
Hematology Unit, G.Gaslini Children's Institute, Genova, Italy.
6
Children's BMT Unit, Great North Children's Hospital, Royal Victoria Infirmary, Newcastle-Upon-Tyne, UK.
7
Department of Stem Cell Transplantation, University Hospital Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany.
8
Department of Haematology, University Medical Centre, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
9
Unità Operativa di Ematologia, Ospedale Civile, Ravenna, Italy.
10
St Bartholomew's Hospital, Barts Health NHS Trust, London, UK.
11
Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel-Hashomer, Israel.
12
Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield, UK.
13
Department of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, University Hospital, Collegium Medicum UMK, Bydgoszcz, Poland.
14
Department of Hematology, Hospital Saint Antoine, Paris, France.

Abstract

Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is an established procedure for many acquired and congenital disorders of the hematopoietic system. A record number of 42 171 HSCT in 37 626 patients (16 030 allogeneic (43%), 21 596 autologous (57%)) were reported by 655 centers in 48 countries in 2015. Trends include continued growth in transplant activity over the last decade, with the highest percentage increase seen in middle-income countries but the highest absolute growth in the very-high-income countries in Europe. Main indications for HSCT were myeloid malignancies 9413 (25%; 96% allogeneic), lymphoid malignancies 24 304 (67%; 20% allogeneic), solid tumors 1516 (4%; 3% allogeneic) and non-malignant disorders 2208 (6%; 90% allogeneic). Remarkable is the decreasing use of allogeneic HSCT for CLL from 504 patients in 2011 to 255 in 2015, most likely to be due to new drugs. Use of haploidentical donors for allogeneic HSCT continues to grow: 2012 in 2015, a 291% increase since 2005. Growth is seen for all diseases. In AML, haploidentical HSCT increases similarly for patients with advanced disease and for those in CR1. Both marrow and peripheral blood are used as the stem cell source for haploidentical HSCT with higher numbers reported for the latter.

PMID:
28287639
PMCID:
PMC5467246
DOI:
10.1038/bmt.2017.34
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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