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J Vis Exp. 2017 Feb 16;(120). doi: 10.3791/54452.

Dynamic Quantitative Sensory Testing to Characterize Central Pain Processing.

Author information

1
Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine.
2
Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine; jtkong@stanford.edu.

Abstract

Central facilitation and modulation of incoming nociceptive signals play an important role in the perception of pain. Disruption in central pain processing is present in many chronic pain conditions and can influence responses to specific therapies. Thus, the ability to precisely describe the state of central pain processing has profound clinical significance in both prognosis and prediction. Because it is not practical to record neuronal firings directly in the human spinal cord, surrogate behavior tests become an important tool to assess the state of central pain processing. Dynamic QST is one such test, and can probe both the ascending facilitation and descending modulation of incoming nociceptive signals via TS and CPM, respectively. Due to the large between-individual variability in the sensitivity to noxious signals, standardized TS and CPM tests may not yield any meaningful data in up to 50% of the population due to floor or ceiling effects. We present methodologies to individualize TS and CPM so we can capture these measures in a broader range of individuals than previously possible. We have used these methods successfully in several studies at the lab, and data from one ongoing study will be presented to demonstrate feasibility and potential applications of the methods.

PMID:
28287532
PMCID:
PMC5407598
DOI:
10.3791/54452
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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