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Body Image. 2017 Jun;21:57-65. doi: 10.1016/j.bodyim.2017.02.007. Epub 2017 Mar 10.

Effects of the exposure to self- and other-referential bodies on state body image and negative affect in resistance-trained men.

Author information

1
Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, Osnabrück University, Knollstraße 15, 49069 Osnabrück, Germany. Electronic address: mcordes@uos.de.
2
Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, Osnabrück University, Knollstraße 15, 49069 Osnabrück, Germany. Electronic address: silja.vocks@uos.de.
3
Department of Experimental Psychology I, Osnabrück University, Seminarstraße 20, 49074 Osnabrück, Germany. Electronic address: rduesing@uos.de.
4
Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, Osnabrück University, Knollstraße 15, 49069 Osnabrück, Germany. Electronic address: manuel.waldorf@uos.de.

Abstract

Previous body image research suggests that first, exposure to body stimuli can negatively affect men's body satisfaction and second, body concerns are associated with dysfunctional gaze behavior. To date, however, the effects of self- vs. other-referential body stimuli and of gaze behavior on body image in men under exposure conditions have not been investigated. Therefore, 49 weight-trained men were presented with pictures of their own and other bodies of different builds (i.e., normal, muscular, hyper-muscular) while being eye-tracked. Participants completed pre- and post-exposure measures of body image and affect. Results indicated that one's own and the muscular body negatively affected men's body image to a comparable degree. Exposure to one's own body also led to increased negative affect. Increased attention toward disliked own body parts was associated with a more negative post-exposure body image and affect. These results suggest a crucial role of critical self-examination in maintaining body dissatisfaction.

KEYWORDS:

Attentional bias; Body checking; Body exposure; Eye-tracking; Male body image; Social comparison

PMID:
28286330
DOI:
10.1016/j.bodyim.2017.02.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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