Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Ethnopharmacol. 2017 Apr 18;202:92-96. doi: 10.1016/j.jep.2017.03.004. Epub 2017 Mar 7.

Anthelmintic effect of Psidium guajava and Tagetes erecta on wild-type and Levamisole-resistant Caenorhabditis elegans strains.

Author information

1
Universidad Autónoma de Querétaro, Facultad de Ciencias Naturales, Av. de las Ciencias S/N, Querétaro, Mexico.
2
Universidad Autónoma de Querétaro, Facultad de Ciencias Naturales, Av. de las Ciencias S/N, Querétaro, Mexico. Electronic address: gomezs@uaq.mx.
3
IPICYT, División de Biología Molecular, Camino a la Presa San José 2055, San Luis Potosí 76216, Mexico. Electronic address: olivo@ipicyt.edu.mx.
4
Universidad Autónoma de Querétaro, Facultad de Ciencias Naturales, Av. de las Ciencias S/N, Querétaro, Mexico. Electronic address: fausto.arellano@uaq.mx.

Abstract

ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE:

Psidium guajava and Tagetes erecta have been used traditionally to treat gastrointestinal parasites, but their active metabolites and mechanisms of action remain largely unknown.

AIM OF THE STUDY:

To evaluate the anthelmintic potential of Psidium guajava and Tagetes erecta extracts on Levamisole-sensitive and Levamisole-resistant strains of the model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Aqueous extracts of Psidium guajava (PGE) and Tagetes erecta (TEE) were assayed on locomotion and egg-laying behaviors of the wild-type (N2) and Levamisole-resistant (CB193) strains of Caenorhabditis elegans.

RESULTS:

Both extracts paralyzed wild-type and Levamisole-resistant nematodes in a dose-dependent manner. In wild-type worms, TEE 25mg/mL induced a 75% paralysis after 8h of treatment and PGE 25mg/mL induced a 100% paralysis after 4h of treatment. PGE exerted a similar paralyzing effect on N2 wild-type and CB193 Levamisole-resistant worms, while TEE only partially paralyzed CB193 worms. TEE 25mg/mL decreased N2 egg-laying by 65% with respect to the untreated control, while PGE did it by 40%.

CONCLUSIONS:

Psidium guajava leaves and Tagetes erecta flower-heads possess hydrosoluble compounds that block the motility of Caenorhabditis elegans by a mechanism different to that of the anthelmintic drug Levamisole. Effects are also observable on oviposition, which was diminished in the wild-type worms. The strong anthelmintic effects in crude extracts of these plants warrants future work to identify their active compounds and to elucidate their molecular mechanisms of action.

KEYWORDS:

Anthelmintic; Caenorhabditis elegans; Levamisole-resistance; Psidium guajava; Tagetes erecta

PMID:
28286043
DOI:
10.1016/j.jep.2017.03.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center