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Body Image. 2017 Jun;21:34-38. doi: 10.1016/j.bodyim.2017.02.006. Epub 2017 Mar 8.

Love me Tinder: Body image and psychosocial functioning among men and women.

Author information

1
College of Merchandising, Hospitality & Tourism, 342H Chilton Hall, 1155 Union Circle #311100, Denton, TX 76203-5017, United States. Electronic address: Jessica.strubel@unt.edu.
2
Department of Psychology, Room 368 Terrill Hall, 1155 Union Circle #311280, Denton, TX 76203-5017, United States. Electronic address: Trent.Petrie@unt.edu.

Abstract

Based on objectification theory, we examined the main effects of Tinder use, and its interaction with gender, in relation to men's and women's body image concerns, internalization processes, and self-esteem. Tinder users (men=31; women=69) and non-users (men=203; women=844) anonymously completed measures via an online survey. Through a series of ANCOVAs, with BMI and age as covariates, Tinder users, regardless of gender, reported significantly lower levels of satisfaction with face and body and higher levels of internalization, appearance comparisons, and body shame and surveillance than non-users. For self-esteem, male Tinder users scored significantly lower than either male or female non-users. Our results suggest that Tinder represents a contemporary medium for appearance pressures and its use is associated with a variety of negative perceptions about body and self and with increases in individuals' likelihood to internalize appearance ideals and make comparisons to others.

KEYWORDS:

Body image; Objectification Theory; Self-esteem; Tinder

PMID:
28285177
DOI:
10.1016/j.bodyim.2017.02.006
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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