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BMC Oral Health. 2017 Mar 11;17(1):62. doi: 10.1186/s12903-017-0352-y.

Dental anomalies: prevalence and associations between them in a large sample of non-orthodontic subjects, a cross-sectional study.

Author information

1
Department of Orthodontics, Department of Clinical Sciences and Translational Medicine, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Via Montpellier, 1, 00133, Rome, Italy. giuseppinalagana@libero.it.
2
Department of Orthodontics, Department of Clinical Sciences and Translational Medicine, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Via Montpellier, 1, 00133, Rome, Italy.
3
Private Practice of Orthodontics, London, England, UK.
4
Warwick Medical School, University of Warwick, Coventry, England, UK.
5
Private Practice, Rome, Italy.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

To analyze the prevalence and associations between dental anomalies detectable on panoramic radiographs in a sample of non-orthodontic growing subjects.

METHODS:

For this cross-sectional study, digital panoramic radiographs of 5005 subjects were initially screened from a single radiographic center in Rome. Inclusion criteria were: subjects who were aged 8-12 years, Caucasian, and had good diagnostic quality radiographs. Syndromic subjects, those with craniofacial malformation, or orthodontic patients were excluded and this led to a sample of 4706 subjects [mean (SD) age = 9.6 (1.2) years, 2366 males and 2340 females]. Sample was subsequently divided into four subgroups (8, 9, 10, and 11-12 year-old groups). Two operators examined panoramic radiographs to observe the presence of common dental anomalies. The prevalence and associations between dental anomalies were also investigated.

RESULTS:

The overall prevalence of dental anomalies was 20.9%. Approximately, 17.9% showed only one anomaly, 2.7% two anomalies, while only 0.3% had more than two anomalies. The most frequent anomalies were the displacement of maxillary canine (7.5%), hypodontia (7.1%), impacted teeth (3.9%), tooth ankylosis (2.8%), and tooth transposition (1.4%). The lower right second premolar was the most frequent missing teeth; 3.7% had only one tooth agenesis, and 0.08% had six or more missing tooth (Oligodontia). Mesiodens was the most common type of supernumerary tooth (0.66%). Two subjects had taurodontic tooth (0.04%). Tooth transpositions and displacement of maxillary canine were seen in 1.4 and 7.5%, retrospectively (approximately 69 and 58% were in the 8 and 9 year-old groups, retrospectively). Significant associations were detected between the different dental anomalies (P < .05).

CONCLUSIONS:

The results of our study revealed significant associations among different dental anomalies and provide further evidences to support common etiological factors.

KEYWORDS:

Non-orthodontic subjects; Panoramic radiograph; Tooth anomalies

PMID:
28284207
PMCID:
PMC5346249
DOI:
10.1186/s12903-017-0352-y
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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