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Trends Endocrinol Metab. 2017 May;28(5):365-376. doi: 10.1016/j.tem.2017.02.007. Epub 2017 Mar 8.

Oxytocin - The Sweet Hormone?

Author information

1
Centre for Integrative Physiology, The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh UK. Electronic address: gareth.leng@ed.ac.uk.
2
Centre for Integrative Physiology, The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh UK.

Abstract

Mammalian neurons that produce oxytocin and vasopressin apparently evolved from an ancient cell type with both sensory and neurosecretory properties that probably linked reproductive functions to energy status and feeding behavior. Oxytocin in modern mammals is an autocrine/paracrine regulator of cell function, a systemic hormone, a neuromodulator released from axon terminals within the brain, and a 'neurohormone' that acts at receptors distant from its site of release. In the periphery oxytocin is involved in electrolyte homeostasis, gastric motility, glucose homeostasis, adipogenesis, and osteogenesis, and within the brain it is involved in food reward, food choice, and satiety. Oxytocin preferentially suppresses intake of sweet-tasting carbohydrates while improving glucose tolerance and supporting bone remodeling, making it an enticing translational target.

PMID:
28283319
DOI:
10.1016/j.tem.2017.02.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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