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Mult Scler Relat Disord. 2017 Feb;12:1-3. doi: 10.1016/j.msard.2016.12.007. Epub 2016 Dec 18.

From bugs to brains: The microbiome in neurological health.

Author information

1
Division of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Djavad Mowafaghian Centre for Brain Health, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
2
Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, Canada.
3
Michael Smith Laboratories, and the Departments of Microbiology & Immunology, and Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
4
Department of Microbiology & Immunology and Life Sciences Institute, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
5
School of Population and Public Health, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
6
Department of Microbiology & Immunology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
7
Division of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Djavad Mowafaghian Centre for Brain Health, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. Electronic address: helen.tremlett@ubc.ca.

Abstract

Knowledge surrounding the trillions of microbes that inhabit the human gut has bloomed exponentially in recent years, and the emerging concept of a gut-brain axis represents a major shift in how we think about neurological health. A recent workshop at the University of British Columbia, Canada brought together multi-disciplinary leaders in the field of microbiomics and brain health and aimed to serve as a springboard for future combined endeavors in these areas. This article provides the motivation for, and overview of, the workshop, and the next steps in establishing a cross-disciplinary initiative on Brain Health and the Microbiome.

KEYWORDS:

Immunology: Multiple sclerosis; Microbiome

PMID:
28283098
DOI:
10.1016/j.msard.2016.12.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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