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Cell. 2017 Mar 9;168(6):960-976. doi: 10.1016/j.cell.2017.02.004.

mTOR Signaling in Growth, Metabolism, and Disease.

Author information

1
Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, 455 Main Street, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA; Department of Biology, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA; Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA; Broad Institute of Harvard and Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 415 Main Street, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA.
2
Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, 455 Main Street, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA; Department of Biology, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA; Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA; Broad Institute of Harvard and Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 415 Main Street, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA. Electronic address: sabatini@wi.mit.edu.

Abstract

The mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) coordinates eukaryotic cell growth and metabolism with environmental inputs, including nutrients and growth factors. Extensive research over the past two decades has established a central role for mTOR in regulating many fundamental cell processes, from protein synthesis to autophagy, and deregulated mTOR signaling is implicated in the progression of cancer and diabetes, as well as the aging process. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of mTOR function, regulation, and importance in mammalian physiology. We also highlight how the mTOR signaling network contributes to human disease and discuss the current and future prospects for therapeutically targeting mTOR in the clinic.

KEYWORDS:

aging; cancer; cell growth; diabetes; mTOR; mTORC1; mTORC2; metabolism; nutrients; signaling

PMID:
28283069
PMCID:
PMC5394987
DOI:
10.1016/j.cell.2017.02.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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