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Sci Rep. 2017 Mar 14;7(1):172. doi: 10.1038/s41598-017-00293-7.

Multimodal brain imaging with magnetoencephalography: A method for measuring blood pressure and cardiorespiratory oscillations.

Author information

1
University of Oulu, Optoelectronics and Measurement Techniques Research Unit, Health & Wellness Measurements Group, Oulu, Finland. teemu.myllyla@oulu.fi.
2
Leibniz Institute for Neurobiology, Magdeburg, Germany.
3
Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Department of Anesthesiology, Neuroimaging Research Group, Berlin, Germany.
4
Oulu University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Oulu, Finland.
5
University of Oulu, Research Unit of Medical Imaging, Physics and Technology, Oulu Functional NeuroImaging Group, Oulu, Finland.
6
University of Oulu, Optoelectronics and Measurement Techniques Research Unit, Health & Wellness Measurements Group, Oulu, Finland.
7
University Hospital Magdeburg, Clinic for Neurology, Magdeburg, Germany.
8
University of Tübingen, Department of Psychiatry, Tübingen, Germany.

Abstract

Studies with magnetoencephalography (MEG) are still quite rarely combined simultaneously with methods that can provide a metabolic dimension to MEG investigations. In addition, continuous blood pressure measurements which comply with MEG compatibility requirements are lacking. For instance, by combining methods reflecting neurovascular status one could obtain more information on low frequency fluctuations that have recently gained increasing interest as a mediator of functional connectivity within brain networks. This paper presents a multimodal brain imaging setup, capable to non-invasively and continuously measure cerebral hemodynamic, cardiorespiratory and blood pressure oscillations simultaneously with MEG. In the setup, all methods apart from MEG rely on the use of fibre optics. In particular, we present a method for measuring of blood pressure and cardiorespiratory oscillations continuously with MEG. The potential of this type of multimodal setup for brain research is demonstrated by our preliminary studies on human, showing effects of mild hypercapnia, gathered simultaneously with the presented modalities.

PMID:
28282963
PMCID:
PMC5412650
DOI:
10.1038/s41598-017-00293-7
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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