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Ann Behav Med. 2017 Oct;51(5):782-786. doi: 10.1007/s12160-017-9891-3.

Resilience Resources Moderate the Association of Adverse Childhood Experiences with Adulthood Inflammation.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, Concordia University, Montreal, Canada. jp.gouin@concordia.ca.
2
PERFORM Center, Concordia University, 7141 Sherbrooke Street West, PY 170-14, Montreal, QC, H4B 1R6, Canada. jp.gouin@concordia.ca.
3
Department of Psychology, Concordia University, Montreal, Canada.
4
Institute for Behavioral Medicine Research, Department of Internal Medicine, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, OH, USA.
5
Comprehensive Cancer Center, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, OH, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Exposure to adverse childhood experiences (ACE) has been associated with elevated circulating inflammatory markers in adulthood. Despite the robust effect of ACE on later health outcomes, not all individuals exposed to ACE suffer from poor health.

PURPOSE:

The goal of this study was to evaluate whether current resilience resources may attenuate the impact of ACE on inflammatory markers among individuals with elevated C-reactive protein (CRP) levels.

METHODS:

Participants (N = 174) completed one-time self-report questionnaires assessing ACE exposure within the first 18 years of life and current resilience resources, and provided blood samples for interleukin-6 (IL-6) and CRP.

RESULTS:

Individuals who were exposed to multiple ACE had greater IL-6 than participants with lesser ACE exposure. However, current resilience resources significantly moderated this effect. Among individuals who reported multiple ACE, higher resilience resources were associated with lower IL-6 levels.

CONCLUSION:

These data suggest that resilience resources might attenuate the association between ACE and later health outcomes.

KEYWORDS:

Adverse Childhood Experience; Early Life Adversity; Meaningful Engagement; Meso Scale Discovery; Perceive Stress Scale

PMID:
28281135
DOI:
10.1007/s12160-017-9891-3
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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