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Patient Educ Couns. 2017 Mar;100(3):526-533. doi: 10.1016/j.pec.2016.10.006. Epub 2016 Oct 12.

Recruiting colorectal cancer survivors to a surveillance study: Barriers and successful strategies.

Author information

1
Department of Public Health Sciences, Cancer Disparities, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, USA. Electronic address: fordmar@musc.edu.
2
Department of Public Health Sciences, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, USA. Electronic address: sterba@musc.edu.
3
Gibbs Cancer Center & Research Institute, Spartanburg Regional Healthcare System, Spartanburg, SC, USA. Electronic address: jbearden@gibbscc.org.
4
Gibbs Cancer Center & Research Institute, Spartanburg Regional Healthcare System, Spartanburg, SC, USA. Electronic address: lgansauer@gibbscc.org.
5
Medical Student, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, USA. Electronic address: moorlesl@musc.edu.
6
Department of Public Health Sciences, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, USA. Electronic address: zapka@musc.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Colorectal cancer (CRC) survival rates are increasing. Effective strategies to recruit CRC survivors to surveillance studies are needed.

OBJECTIVE:

We analyzed the barriers encountered while recruiting CRC survivors to a study assessing their surveillance care experiences.

METHODS:

The study included three phases: (I) focus groups/key informant interviews; (II) cognitive interviews; and (III) a statewide population-based telephone survey.

PARTICIPANTS:

In Phases I-II, clinic-based data and cancer center registries were used to identify CRC survivors who had received CRC resection within the past 18 months. In Phase III, survivors who had received CRC resection within the past two years were identified via a statewide, population-based cancer registry.

RESULTS:

In Phase I, 16 survivors participated in focus groups at two National Cancer Center-affiliated sites (response rate=29.6%). Eighteen additional survivors participated in individual interviews (response rate=50%). In Phase II, 11 survivors participated in cognitive interviews (response rate=81.8%). In Phase III, 150 survivors participated in the statewide survey (response rate=62.2%).

CONCLUSIONS:

Group-based/in-person recruitment efforts were unsuccessful due to scheduling barriers, lack of transportation, and remaining discomfort from previous resection surgery. Telephone-based data collection strategies produced higher response rates.

PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS:

To enhance CRC surveillance research, future studies could incorporate CRC survivor-centered recruitment strategies.

KEYWORDS:

Cancer surveillance; Cancer survivorship; Colorectal cancer

PMID:
28277291
PMCID:
PMC5985812
DOI:
10.1016/j.pec.2016.10.006
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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