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Int J Radiat Biol. 2017 Jun;93(6):607-616. doi: 10.1080/09553002.2017.1293865. Epub 2017 Mar 3.

Skin absorption of actinides: influence of solvents or chelates on skin penetration ex vivo.

Author information

1
a iRCM/DRF/CEA, Laboratoire de Radio Toxicologie, CEA, Université Paris-Saclay , Arpajon , France.
2
b UMR CNRS 5007, Laboratoire de Dermopharmacie et Cosmétologie , Laboratoire d'Automatique et de Génie des Procédés (LAGEP), Université de Lyon , Lyon , France.
3
c College of Optical Sciences, The University of Arizona , Tucson , AZ , USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To evaluate skin penetration and retention of americium (Am) and plutonium (Pu), in different chemical forms relevant to the nuclear industry and to treatment by chelation.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Percutaneous penetration of different Am and Pu forms were evaluated using viable pig skin with the Franz cell diffusion system. The behavior of the complex Pu-tributyl phosphate (Pu-TBP), Am or Pu complexed to the chelator Diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) and the effect of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) was assessed. Radioactivity was measured in skin and receiver compartments. Three approaches were used to visualize activity in skin including the recent iQID technique for quantification.

RESULTS:

Transfer of Am was 24-fold greater than Pu and Pu-TBP complex penetration was enhanced by 500-fold. Actinide-DTPA transfer was greater than the Am or Pu alone (17-fold and 148-fold, respectively). The stratum corneum retained the majority of activity in all cases and both DMSO and TBP enhanced skin retention of Am and Pu, respectively. Histological and bioimaging data confirmed these results and the iQID camera allowed the quantification of skin activity.

CONCLUSIONS:

Skin penetration and fixation profiles are different depending on the chemical actinide form. Altered behavior of Pu-TBP and actinide-DTPA complexes reinforces the need to address decontamination protocols.

KEYWORDS:

Actinides; DMSO; DTPA; TBP; skin contamination

PMID:
28276896
DOI:
10.1080/09553002.2017.1293865
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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