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Neuroimage Clin. 2017 Jan 27;14:464-470. doi: 10.1016/j.nicl.2017.01.030. eCollection 2017.

Cognitive behavioral therapy increases amygdala connectivity with the cognitive control network in both MDD and PTSD.

Author information

1
Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of Pennsylvania, United States.
2
Department of Psychiatry, University of Pennsylvania, United States.
3
Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, United States.
4
Department of Psychological Sciences, Center for Trauma Recovery, University of Missouri-St Louis, United States.
5
Department of Psychiatry, University of Pennsylvania, United States; Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, United States.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Both major depressive disorder (MDD) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are characterized by alterations in intrinsic functional connectivity. Here we investigated changes in intrinsic functional connectivity across these disorders as a function of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), an effective treatment in both disorders.

METHODS:

53 unmedicated right-handed participants were included in a longitudinal study. Patients were diagnosed with PTSD (n = 18) and MDD (n = 17) with a structured diagnostic interview and treated with 12 sessions of manualized CBT over a 12-week period. Patients received an MRI scan (Siemens 3 T Trio) before and after treatment. Longitudinal functional principal components analysis (LFPCA) was performed on functional connectivity of the bilateral amygdala with the fronto-parietal network. A matched healthy control group (n = 18) was also scanned twice for comparison.

RESULTS:

LFPCA identified four eigenimages or principal components (PCs) that contributed significantly to the longitudinal change in connectivity. The second PC differentiated CBT-treated patients from controls in having significantly increased connectivity of the amygdala with the fronto-parietal network following CBT.

LIMITATIONS:

Analysis of CBT-induced amygdala connectivity changes was restricted to the a priori determined fronto-parietal network. Future studies are needed to determine the generalizability of these findings, given the small and predominantly female sample.

CONCLUSION:

We found evidence for the hypothesis that CBT treatment is associated with changes in connectivity between the amygdala and the fronto-parietal network. CBT may work by strengthening connections between the amygdala and brain regions that are involved in cognitive control, potentially providing enhanced top-down control of affective processes that are dysregulated in both MDD and PTSD.

KEYWORDS:

Amygdala; Cognitive behavioral therapy; Fronto-parietal network; Principal component analysis; Resting state functional connectivity

PMID:
28275546
PMCID:
PMC5331144
DOI:
10.1016/j.nicl.2017.01.030
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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