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Dig Liver Dis. 2017 Jun;49(6):618-622. doi: 10.1016/j.dld.2017.02.003. Epub 2017 Feb 16.

Vitamin D and histologic severity of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

Author information

1
Department of Internal Medicine, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI, USA; Department of Internal Medicine, King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand. Electronic address: veeravich_j@hotmail.com.
2
Department of Internal Medicine, Norwalk Hospital, Norwalk, CT, USA. Electronic address: dr.ahuja.wasin@gmail.com.
3
Department of Internal Medicine, Bassett Medical Center and Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, Cooperstown, NY, USA; Department of Preventive and Social Medicine, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Thailand. Electronic address: anawin.sanguankeo@bassett.org.
4
Department of Internal Medicine, Bassett Medical Center and Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, Cooperstown, NY, USA. Electronic address: dr.karn.wi@gmail.com.
5
Department of Internal Medicine, Bassett Medical Center and Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, Cooperstown, NY, USA; Department of Preventive and Social Medicine, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Thailand. Electronic address: sikarin.upala@bassett.org.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

NAFLD and vitamin D deficiency often coexist and epidemiologic evidence has shown that both of these conditions share several risk factors. Recent studies investigating the relationship between vitamin D levels and severity of NAFLD showed conflicting results. Thus we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate association between vitamin D and NAFLD histologic severity.

METHODS:

A comprehensive search of the databases of the MEDLINE and EMBASE was performed from inception through November 2016. Observational studies compared serum vitamin D levels among NAFLD patients with high and low histologic severity, which was determined by NAFLD activity score (NAS) and fibrosis score. We calculated pooled mean difference (MD) of 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels with 95% confidence intervals (CI) using random-effects model.

RESULTS:

Data were extracted from 6 studies involving 974 NAFLD patients. There was no difference in 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels among NAFLD patients with high NAS (score of ≥5) versus low NAS (pooled MD=-0.93, 95%CI -2.45 to 0.58, I2=0%) and also high fibrosis score (score of ≥3) versus low fibrosis score (pooled MD=0.88, 95%CI -2.65 to 4.42, I2=64%).

CONCLUSIONS:

Despite evidence implicating vitamin D in NAFLD pathogenesis, serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D may not be associated with NAFLD histologic severity.

KEYWORDS:

Fibrosis; Liver histology; Meta-analysis; NAFLD activity score; Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease; Vitamin D

PMID:
28274829
DOI:
10.1016/j.dld.2017.02.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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