Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Adolesc Health. 2017 Jun;60(6):727-733. doi: 10.1016/j.jadohealth.2017.01.002. Epub 2017 Mar 6.

Different Demands, Same Goal: Promoting Transition Readiness in Adolescents and Young Adults With and Without Medical Conditions.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia. Electronic address: cydeaton@gmail.com.
2
Department of Psychology, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

This study aimed to examine differences in transition readiness, self-involvement and parental involvement in completing medical tasks, and general self-efficacy between a sample of older adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with medical conditions and a sample of healthy peers. Relations among these variables were also examined.

METHODS:

The sample included 494 AYAs (mean age = 19.30 years, standard deviation = 1.33) who reported on their levels of transition readiness, self-involvement and parental involvement in completing medical tasks, and general self-efficacy.

RESULTS:

AYAs with medical conditions reported significantly higher levels of transition readiness and self-involvement in completing medical tasks and lower levels of parent involvement in completing medical tasks than healthy peers. Parent involvement in completing medical tasks indirectly related to transition readiness through AYA self-involvement in completing medical tasks for both AYAs with medical conditions and healthy peers.

CONCLUSIONS:

AYAs with medical conditions appear to have greater transition readiness skills and demonstrate more independence in completing medical tasks than healthy peers. For AYAs with medical conditions and healthy peers, transition readiness appears to be enhanced as parents decrease their involvement in completing AYAs' medical tasks and AYAs increase self-involvement in completing these tasks. AYAs with medical conditions, as well as healthy peers, may benefit from programming delivered in primary care, specialty clinic, or educational settings that focuses on increasing AYAs' involvement in and responsibility for managing their health care.

KEYWORDS:

Autonomy; Emerging adulthood; Health promotion; Transition readiness

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center